Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Old Testament Essays]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=1010-991920150001&lang=pt vol. 28 num. 1 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Epistemic: vulnerability</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192015000100001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>God's wrath and judgment on ethnic hatred and hope for victims of ethnic hatred in Obadiah: Implications for Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192015000100002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Ethnic hatred has caused many lives on the African continent. In many cases victims of ethnic hatred are left without hope for the future. The book of Obadiah shows that there is hope for victims of ethnic hatred. This article looks at the book from the viewpoint that considers God's wrath and judgment on ethnic hatred, his assurance of justice and his plan to give hope to victims of ethnic hatred. Compared to Judah's misfortune, the Edomites used their advantage to participate in the destruction of "a brother" nation. But God would administer justice which would lead to the abasement of Edom and offer hope to Judah. Victims of ethnic hatred in Africa should console themselves with the fact that God will administer justice that would see to the punishment of those who take advantage of their condition and offer them (victims of ethnic hatred) a better future. <![CDATA[<b>The task and distinctiveness of African biblical hermeneutic(s)</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192015000100003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Tins paper deals with the nature of African biblical hermeneutic( s), its task and distinctiveness. African biblical hermeneutic is the principle of interpretation of the Bible for transformation in Africa, It can also be called African cultural hermeneutic(s) or African biblical transformational hermeneutic(s) or African Biblical Studies. 'Hie task of African biblical hermeneutic(s) includes, firstly and foremost to formulation of a biblical hermeneutic that is "liberational and transformational"; secondly, to break the hermeneutical hegemony and ideological stranglehold that Eurocentric biblical scholars have long enjoyed; thirdly, to understand the Bible and God according to Scripture and African culture and tradition; fourthly, to interpret the Bible existentially; fifthly, to blacken the Bible; sixthly, to reappraise the Bible in order to correct the effect of the cultural ideological conditioning to which Africa and Africans have been subjected in the business of biblical interpretation; and seventhly, to promote African culture, tradition and identity. African biblical hermeneutic(s) has the following methodological distinctiveness: communal reading and interpretation, Bible as power, Africa and Africans in the Bible, African comparative, African evaluative, using Africa to interpret the Bible and using the Bible to interpret Africa, the promotion of distinctive life interest, and African identity. <![CDATA[<b>Reconsidering the fear of God in Job 37:14-24 and Qohelet 3:1-17 in the light of Rudolf Otto's <i>Das</i> <i>Heilige</i></b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192015000100004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This article takes further the work begun in a previous article² by investigating the notion of the fear of God in the HB in the light of Rudolf Otto's Das Heilige. The focus of this article is on the usefulness of Otto's views for understanding the meaning and significance of the fear of God in the two wisdom texts of Job 37:14-24 and Qoh 3:1-17. It is argued that taking Otto's views on the mysterium tre-mendum into account helps to facilitate a greater appreciation of the multifaceted nature of the fear of God in these texts. Maintaining the (creative) tension in the human experience of the divine, put into words most admirably by Otto, is found to be of the importance for the interpretation of Job 37:14-24 and Qoh 3:1-17 - as it may very well also be for other texts of the HB. <![CDATA[<b>To what extent is <i>Ezekiel</i> the source of resurrection of the dead in 4Q385 <i>Pseudo-Ezekiel</i> and Targum Ezekiel?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192015000100005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Tins article is a response to Daniel Block's recent statement that Ezekiel offers hope to the people that "there is life after death and there is hope beyond the grave, " but some scholars have objected to what has been called Christian supersessionalism. The research question is a) whether concepts of resurrection of the dead can have had their source in specific passages in the book of Ezekiel, and if so, b) whether the concept in Ezekiel applies to the "house of Israel" as a group, or to righteous individuals. Ezekiel marks the transition from pre-exilic Israelite religion to post-exilic Judaism and it has been suggested that he laid the foundation for the symbolic universe of apocalypticism. The eschatological element of judgment after death has now been seen to be an essential part of Jewish apocalypticism. The essence of the research question is: to what extent can Ezekiel be seen to have born such eschatological seeds? For various reasons, it is not possible to construct a linear progression of beliefs about the afterlife in Hebrew texts. Therefore the methodological approach was to examine relevant sections of two later extra-Biblical Jewish texts which are both clearly based on Ezekiel and which are both to some extent concerned with resurrection after death. Consequently relevant passages in 4Q385 Pseudo-Ezekiel and Targum Ezekiel have been compared to Ezekiel MT to yield some indication of the actual connections in this regard. <![CDATA[<b>Rethinking the "dual causality principle" in Old Testament research - A philosophical perspective</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192015000100006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Reframing an old idea in philosophical theology, OT scholars have for the last half-century spoken of what has come to be known as the "dual causality principle " (DCP). The latter is supposed to denote a folk-met a-physical assumption in some OT texts characterized by the assignment of both divine and human causes to account for certain states of affairs. In this article the author challenges the consensus and argues that since the notion of causes is also a philosophical matter the theory behind the DCP may be supplemented by a descriptive metaphysical perspective. Typologies of causation show that the DCP is too simplistic and vague a concept since it ignores a host of complex metaphysical distinctions about causal types, relations and theories. Ultimately, causation in the OT is a complex phenomenon and technically not reducible to duality, causality, or to a principle of any sort. <![CDATA[<b>L'influence du livre des Proverbes sur le livre d'Osée, en relation avec les livres de Jérémie et d'Isaïe</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192015000100007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Le livre des Proverbes joue un rôle important dans la rédaction du livre d'Osée en relation à la conclusion de 14,10. Cette influence est particulièrement liée au transfert sur le royaume du Nord de plusieurs condamnations concernant le royaume du Sud dans les livres d'Isaïe et de Jérémie.<hr/>The Book of Proverbs plays cm important role in the redaction of the Book of Hosea in connection with the conclusion of Hosea in 14, 10. This influence is particularly related to the transfer upon the Northern Kingdom of some condemnations pronounced about the Southern Kingdom in the Books of Isaiah and Jeremiah. <![CDATA[<b>Comments on the expression of hope in LXX Lamentations 5:19-22</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192015000100008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt In the writings of the HB, hope appears to be an attitude in which human beings look forward and wait in expectation for the advent or arrival of what is considered to be future possibilities. This often involves a measure of uncertainty and/or tension between the present situation and the state or conditions that are hoped for. Furthermore, the acts and words of YHWH have a central place in the worldview in which the hopes are grounded. Lamentations 5:19-22 is an interesting example of such an attitude of hope in the HB. The Hebrew wording (as represented by the MT) is, however, not the only legitimate representative of the content of these verses. The Greek translation (LXX Lam) is another important witness to the text and content of Lam 5:19-22. The purpose of this study is to determine how LXX Lam presents the hope that is expressed in these verses and thereby to gain a better understanding of it as a representative of the content of Lamentations. <![CDATA[<b>"I"-voice, emotion, and selfhood in Nehemiah</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192015000100009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Surviving the Agagites: A postcolonial reading of Esther 8-9</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192015000100010&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt From a postcolonial perspective, the Jews in the book of Esther not only resist against and survive the Agagites, they also re-appropriate colonising impulses from their cultural memory. This article argues that the battles in Esth 8-9 contain several appropriations from holy war in the Deuteronomistic History, and, as a result, the said narrative can be identified as written to fit within the trajectory of the Jews' own imperium. This literary intertextuality is underpinned by three expressions of holy-war language and protocol: fear falling on the Jews' enemies, the Jews refraining from plundering, and the postwar hanging of corpses on trees. <![CDATA[<b>Book reviews </b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192015000100011&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt From a postcolonial perspective, the Jews in the book of Esther not only resist against and survive the Agagites, they also re-appropriate colonising impulses from their cultural memory. This article argues that the battles in Esth 8-9 contain several appropriations from holy war in the Deuteronomistic History, and, as a result, the said narrative can be identified as written to fit within the trajectory of the Jews' own imperium. This literary intertextuality is underpinned by three expressions of holy-war language and protocol: fear falling on the Jews' enemies, the Jews refraining from plundering, and the postwar hanging of corpses on trees.