Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Old Testament Essays]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=1010-991920100003&lang=es vol. 23 num. 3 lang. es <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Teaching the history of ancient Israel from an African perspective: The invasion of Sennacherib of 701 B.C.E. as an example</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300001&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es In teaching the history of ancient Israel in Africa, the importance of ancient Africa which ancient Israel herself underscored, has not received much attention. In most African higher institutions today, the history of ancient Israel is taught verbatim the way it is taught in Euro-American institutions. The ancient nations of Africa mentioned in the biblical and archaeological texts (such as Egypt, Ethiopia or Kush, etc.) and their roles in ancient Israel should be mentioned and emphasised as part of African contribution to the history of ancient Israel.¹ Ancient Africa and Africans (Egypt, Ethiopia, Punt and others) were mentioned about 1,417 times in the Old Testament scriptures. Africans participated in the battle of Ashdod, Eltekeh and Jerusalem during the invasion of Sennacherib to defend ancient Israel and also to obstruct their rivals, the Assyrians. In teaching the history of ancient Israel in African higher institutions, current problems associated with the identification of Egypt and Ethiopia as African countries, divergent scholars' opinion and the proper definition of history are discussed. Jerusalem could have fallen in 701 B.C.E. during Sennacherib's siege, instead of 587 B.C.E. during the siege by the Babylonians. Thus, the Africans ' obstruction of the Assyrians in defence of Hezekiah has delayed the fall of Jerusalem more than 100 years. An example of how the history of ancient Israel can be taught Africentrically in African higher institutions is reflected by the examination of Sennacherib's invasion in 701 B.C.E.. The way the Old Testament is taught, may to a large extent determine the future of Old Testament studies in Africa. <![CDATA[<b>Complex antiphony in Psalms 121, 126 and 128: The steady responsa hypothesis</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300002&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Psalms 121, 126 and 128 are three songs of Ascents displaying the same structural characteristics: (i) they include two distinct parts, each one with its own theme; (ii) the two parts have the same number of verse lines;, (iii) many grammatical and semantic similarities are found between the homolog verse lines from the two parts; (iv) a literary breakdown exists between the last verse of the first part and the first verse of the second part. These features remain unexplained as long as these poems are approached in a linear fashion. Here we test the hypothesis that these songs were performed antiphonally by two choirs, each one singing another part of the poem. This mode of complex antiphony is defined here as steady responsa. In the three songs analyzed here, the "composite text" issued from such a pairing of distant verses displays a high level of coherency, new literary properties, images and metaphors, echo patterns typical to antiphony and even "composite meanings" ignored by the linear reading. We conclude that these three psalms were originally conceived to be performed as steady responsa. <![CDATA[<b>Why do readers believe Lot? Genesis 19 reconsidered</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300003&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The popular reading of the story of the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah in Genesis 19 credits the destruction of the cities to rampant homosexuality. The basis of this reading is found in the ambiguous statement of the deity in Genesis 18:20 as to their "grave sin" and Lot's statement in 19:8 that the men of Sodom should sexually assault his daughters instead of the men. These two statements, grounded in patriarchy, heterosexism, ethnocentrism and theocentrism underpin the sanction to oppress same gender loving people with the "authority of holy hatred". This article will give an alternative reading to the narrative by concentrating on literary cues, often masked by translation choices, by characterizations of Lot and the deity, and by comparisons with other similar plot details. My contention is that the narrative can be read as a spy tale on the order of Joshua 2 and 2 Samuel 10. I also contend that the proposed use of the bodies of Lot's daughters follows other biblical narratives of men feeling threatened and who use women's bodies to protect themselves. Finally I argue that the translation choices of the commentators in presenting the narrative and discussing the passage ignore other options of translation and interpretation, thus, readers are kept bound to see this story as one about homosexuality instead of daughters being sexually abused. The latter possibility is so horrific that the anti-homosexual reading has been sustained by readers in order to not only exonerate the deity but also to support patriarchal, ethnocentric, theocentric and heterosexist privileges. <![CDATA[<b>The book of Isaiah as Isaiah's book: The latest developments in the research of the prophets</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300004&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The aim of this article is to represent conclusions for scholarly exegesis from recent developments in the field of the prophets, especially those pertaining to the Book of Isaiah. In order to do this, the author will pay attention in this article to the following aspects: (1) The prophet's book before the prophet's word; (2) The prophet as authority of the book; (3) Deutero-Isaiah: from hypothesis to author personality; (4) An anonymous prophet? The critical objections against the Deutero-Isaiah hypothesis; (5) The figure of the prophet and the redaction-critical research of Isa 40-55; (6) The temple-singer hypothesis as alternative: from the individual to the collective; (7) The double tracked argumentation of a solution; (8) The discursive continuation of the tradition around Isaiah ben Amoz as Isaiah's book. <![CDATA[<b>Psalm 108 and the quest for closure to the exile</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300005&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Ps 108 is studied as a composition sui generis in terms of its poetic features and ideological intent. It is subsequently also compared to its two donor texts (Ps 57 and Ps 60) to determine how the selection and editorial adaptation of those verses which were used to create the new composition reveal something about its textual strategy and purpose. The strategy of its authors seems to have been the transformation of the oracle found in Ps 60 from a context of lamentation to one of future hope. The authors emphasised YHWH's universal majesty in contradistinction to the local insignificance of their enemies; and the global power of YHWH in contradistinction to the futility of human endeavours. <![CDATA[<b>Ideology, History and Translation Theories: A critical Analysis of the TshiVen</b><b>ḓ</b><b>a Bible Translation of 1 Kings 21:1-16</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300006&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Although Christianity came to South Africa in 1652, the expansion of Christianity in South Africa began with different missionary societies working among different tribes. For the spread of Christianity to make meaningful impact in the lives of the indigenous people, there arose the need to translate the Bible into various local languages. This may not render the same meaning to local people in their own vernacular. Perhaps this may have contributed to the quest for new translation of the Bible by various locals in order for more meaningful usage of their own vernacular. This paper, therefore, calls for a critical analysis of the Tshivenḓa Bible (1936 version) as it relates to translation ideology, history and translation theories with particular reference to the Tshivenda Bible translation of 1 Kings 21:1-26. This will be done in the following six steps. First, we will discuss translation ideology. Second, we will examine translation history. Third, we will analyse translation theory. Fourth, we will look at the translation of 1 Kings 21:1-16. Here we will start off by examining the 1936 Tshivenḓa Bible translation of 1 Kings 21:1-16. Thereafter we will go on to examine our own translation of the abovementioned text. Fifth, we will compare our own translation to the 1936 Tshivenḓa one. And, finally, we will spell out few challenges facing both translation studies and African Biblical Hermeneutics. <![CDATA[<b>Old Testament theology and philosophy of religion: A brief history of interdisciplinary relations</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300007&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Overviews of the history of biblical interpretation sometimes include references to major philosophical trends, ideas and sub-disciplines that have influenced readers of the Old Testament (OT). Curiously, no overview exclusively devoted to describing relations to philosophy of religion has ever been written. In this paper, the first such account is provided by way of a purely descriptive introduction to how OT theologians have remarked on and utilised philosophical approaches to the study of religion. <![CDATA[<b>Rape and the case of Dinah: Ethical responsibilities for reading Genesis 34</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300008&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The rape of Dinah in Genesis 34 is an unsettling story that creates discomfort for interpreters, evident in the variety and uncertainty displayed in their interpretations of the rape incident. Dinah's rape is either minimised, denied or the victim is blamed for what happened to her. Interpretations derive from the cultural assumptions of their time and interpretations of this text reflect a culture that encourages rape and sympathises with the rapist. These interpretations have ethical consequences, for by silencing the victim and not taking a stance against the rapist, the rampant rape epidemic of our time is perpetuated. To substantiate this observation, interpretations of Genesis 34 will be explored, tracing the way interpreters read their cultural assumptions about sexual violence into the text. An ethics of Bible reading is proposed that accepts responsibility for the integrity of Dinah, the victim character in the text, as well as for those on the reception side of the interpretation. <![CDATA[<b>Levels of contextual synergy in the Korah Psalms: The example of Psalm 86</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300009&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The essay is based on two observations: First, a single psalm of David (Ps 86) finds itself in the middle of four Korah Psalms, which generates the question as to the meaning of the contextual relationship between one part of a whole and another part of the same whole. Second, a certain form-critical symmetry exists within the group centring on Psalm 86, which generates a further contextual dimension, notably that of genre-related intertextuality. The symmetry and aspects of cohesion within the Korah group as well as the form-critical organisation of the group are considered and conclusions drawn as to several kinds of synergy generated by these relationships, both regarding the individual psalm and its relationships to surrounding collections as well as the Psalter as a whole. <![CDATA[<b>The Danite invasion of Laish and the purpose of the book of Judges</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300010&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Past scholarship has explained the structure of the Book of Judges as a cycle of apostasy, foreign domination, deliverance and apostasy and has treated the final four chapters of the book as appendices. As if this were an adequate pronouncement on the literary structure of the book, many commentators then shifted their attention to the historical and geographical information said to underlie the stories of the book. More recent scholarship has tended to view almost every book of the Old Testament as an eventual product of Deuteronomistic redaction, with the Book of Judges forming part of the so-called Deuteronomistic history. In this framework, the appendices are said to be significantly marked by an editorial observation that is actually an expression of optimism in kingship. We, however, argue that the intention of the author is traceable in his use of syntax throughout the book of Judges. By a more careful examination of his use of syntax and details of the reports concerning the military successes of the tribes of Judah at the beginning of the book and of Dan at the end of the book, the author may be more correctly heard as he responds to questions raised concerning the reason for the exile and future of the tribes. Not only does this approach to Judges demonstrate that the account of the tribe of Dan is not a mere "appendix", but it also places Judges more realistically among the various voices clamouring to be heard during the exile. <![CDATA[<b>Creation theology in Psalm 139</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300011&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The first reference in the Bible to God's activities is "in the beginning, God created. " This puts "Creator" at the top of the list of descriptions of who Yahweh is and what Yahweh does. This implies that Yahweh stands in relationship with the world, and not only with Israel. Israel was created to be his people as a result of him being the Creator of the world. He is therefore the God of all humanity and the ultimate source of creation. God's creative actions began "in the beginning," but it did not stop there. God's creative activities include originating, continuing and completing creation. There are an abundance of creation texts in the Old Testament. Genesis, Exodus, the legal texts of the Pentateuch, the prophets, wisdom texts and the psalms all contribute to the OT theology on creation. My purpose with this article is to analyse Psalm 139 to determine how this psalm articulates creation theology. Creation theology plays a decisive role in every aspect of the psalm. God's omniscience (vv. 1-6), his omnipresence (vv. 7-12), his creation of humankind (vv. 13-18) and the petition for vengeance and transformation (vv. 19-24) should be understood within the framework of creation theology. <![CDATA[<b>Delighting in the Torah: The affective dimension of Psalm 1</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300012&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es It is argued in this article that the common interpretation of Ps 1 as a call for obedience, a view exemplified by Walter Brueggemann's influential article, "Bounded by Obedience and Praise: The Psalms as Canon," does not quite capture the emphasis of the text. While it is true that Ps 1 affirms the lifestyle of the "righteous," righteousness is not limited to or equated with "obedience. " The psalm points to the affections rather than to behaviour as the key element of the righteous person-"his delight is in the Torah of Yahweh" (Ps 1:2). Instead of calling for obedience to the Torah, Ps 1 evokes affection for the Torah. This important move suggests that the study of biblical poetry in general and of the Psalms in particular can benefit from an approach that is attuned to the passions that are inherent in the text and the passions that are brought to the text by the interpreter. <![CDATA[<b>Parental instruction in differing contexts: Using hermeneutical phenomenology to understand selected biblical and African Proverbs</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300013&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es It is argued in this article that the common interpretation of Ps 1 as a call for obedience, a view exemplified by Walter Brueggemann's influential article, "Bounded by Obedience and Praise: The Psalms as Canon," does not quite capture the emphasis of the text. While it is true that Ps 1 affirms the lifestyle of the "righteous," righteousness is not limited to or equated with "obedience. " The psalm points to the affections rather than to behaviour as the key element of the righteous person-"his delight is in the Torah of Yahweh" (Ps 1:2). Instead of calling for obedience to the Torah, Ps 1 evokes affection for the Torah. This important move suggests that the study of biblical poetry in general and of the Psalms in particular can benefit from an approach that is attuned to the passions that are inherent in the text and the passions that are brought to the text by the interpreter. <![CDATA[<b>The ancient mediterranean values of "honour and shame" as a hermeneutical lens of reading the Book of Job</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300014&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The book of Job is here read through the ancient Near Eastern values of honour and shame and also in relationship to its placing within Wisdom literature. This article points out the fact that the book of Job goes beyond focus of wisdom whose primary concern is navigating life successfully. For Job, it is the concern of what Gustavo Guttiérez calls disinterested faith that puts God's honour at the centre of his struggles. <![CDATA[<b>How the Methodist Church of Southern Africa read Leviticus 18:22 and 20:13 in view of homosexuality</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300015&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es In recent times, the texts of Leviticus 18:22 and 20:13 have attracted the attention of Old Testament scholars, clergy and the laity, alike. In my view, such an attention has been inspired by the readers' quest for a possible light that both biblical texts shed on the acceptance and practice of homosexuality among societies. Lately, homosexuality has been one of the topical and burning issues in the present day South Africa. Therefore it does not come as a surprise that interpreting texts such as Leviticus 18:22 and 20:13 becomes pertinent in our society. This research aims to explore the inability of MCSA to provide a sound rationale to reject homosexuality. In addition, this study endeavours to establish that acceptance and or rejection of homosexuality as a love relationship cannot be based on Leviticus 18:22 and 20:13. Using methodologies such as the literary, textual, canonical and socio-scientific criticism, Leviticus 18:22 and 20:13 will be examined, particularly in light of how MCSA read and interpret these texts. This argument is intended to make a necessary contribution to African biblical hermeneutics. <![CDATA[<b>When interpretation traditions speak too loud for ethical dilemmas to be heard: On the untimely death of Haran (Genesis 11:28)</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300016&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The author argues that the majority of modern day translations of Genesis 11:28a, reading "Haran died in the lifetime of Terah, his father" (or wording to that effect) missed the intention of the narrator's actual words "Haran died in the face of (in confrontation with) Terah, his father." His working hypothesis, concluding the exegesis of the text, is that the narrator faced the ethical dilemma of having the task to tell a positive story about the origins of Israel while knowing the dark side which he, as an honest witness, could not negate, and consequently alluded to. This "small voice" of the author/narrator can easily be silenced and is consequently not picked up by strong translation traditions, as indeed happened in this case. <![CDATA[<b>The ethics of reading and the quest for the audience in the book of Chronicles</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300017&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This article will illustrate the validity of Elizabeth Schüssler Fiorenza's SBL Presidential address of 1987 on the topic of the ethics of interpretation, namely doing justice to the text in its historical originating context by inquiring, inter alia into the author's responsibility towards his audience. Firstly, Schüssler Fiorenza's ideas on the socio-political location of the reader will be stated, after which that specific location for Chronicles will be explored in terms of the power in the Persian Empire as well as a look at the Persian Empire through modern imperial eyes. The article will conclude with a few remarks on the identity of the author and audience. <![CDATA[<b>Eco-theology and losing the sacred</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300018&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Within an eco-theological context Christianity, more specifically Protestantism, has been blamed for our current ecological crisis due to the fact that it has lost its sense of the sacred. The purpose of this article is to explore how this de-sacralisation or disenchantment of nature may be linked to a specific cosmology or worldview and the theological implications such a loss of the sacred may have on the eco-theological debate. It is concluded that it is not possible to regain a sense of the sacred, except if one is willing to revert back to a pre-Renaissance magico-mythical worldview and that eco-theologians should rather search for more appropriate metaphors when arguing for the conservation of the environment. <![CDATA[<b>Die Buchouvertüre Psalm 1-3 und ihre Bedeutung für das Verständnis des Psalters</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300019&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es With the help of reception-aesthetic considerations and with regard to the hermeneutics of the book and canonical theology, the beginning of the book of Psalms is interpreted as an introduction to the message of the whole book. Because the reader encounters the book primarily in the form of a consecutive reading from one psalm to the next, and since Pss 1-3 each involves a new theme and level of communication (which is no longer the case with Ps 4), the article argues for a threefold overture: "(Torah-)Wisdom" (Ps 1), the "Royal rule of God and his anointed" (Ps 2), and "praying with David" (Ps 3) are the three main theological and spiritual themes of the Psalter. The commonly held opinion that Pss 1 and 2 form a double portal into the Psalter is brought into question since the pairing of Pss 1-2 on the one hand and the grouping of Pss 3-14 as the first ensemble of the first Davidic Psalter (Pss 3-41*) on the other is perceptible only after a re-reading and memorizing of the book. Two different techniques of arrangement of psalms should be recognized: The prayers (of David), beginning with Ps 3, are placed in a series of adjacent psalms. But from time to time wisdom- and royal psalms are inserted at (the most) strategic places in order to interrupt the main line of prayer for theological reflection. Some hints are given of how the themes addressed in Pss 1-3 as the overture to the Psalter are developed in the book as a whole. <![CDATA[<b>God the creator: Contrasting images in Psalm 65:10-14 and Jeremiah 23:9-15</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300020&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es In this article two contrasting images of God as the creator are highlighted. For this purpose Psalm 65:10-14 and Jeremiah 23:9-15 are discussed in relation to each other. What started off as an observation of two contrasting texts on creation resulted in challenging theological questions about God. On the one hand he is the one who blesses creation, but on the other the one who curses creation. The theological issue addressed is that God, when it comes to his involvement with creation, is portrayed by these two testimonies of Israel as responsible for good as well as bad. <![CDATA[<b>Unstructural analysis of the bible reinforcing unstructural analysis of African contexts in (South) Africa?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300021&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es In the 1980s South African biblical scholar Itumeleng Mosala argued that there was a danger within South African Black Theology that "unstructural understanding of the Bible " might simply "reinforce and confirm unstructural understanding of the present." This article argues that what Mosala predicted might happen within Black Theology has indeed happened, but that it has happened more generally within the religious sector as well as the state sector in post-apartheid South Africa. The article goes on to argue, using the work of Paul Gifford, that this trend brings South Africa into alignment with a similar development in many other African countries. The article concludes with some reflection on what a "structural understanding" of the biblical economic systems might contribute to a more structural understanding of current African contextual realities. <![CDATA[<b>In search of the right metaphor: A response to Peet van Dyk's "Challenges in the search for an ecotheology" Part two: Searching for an alternative</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300022&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This article continues with the investigation of the dominion metaphor in Gen 1:28 that was published in OTE 23 (2). In the first section the author deals with alternative proposals to this metaphor, namely Earth as voice and the world as God's body. The former suggests an ecojustice hermeneutic as proposed by Norman Habel and the latter suggests a feminist critique as poposed by Sallie McFague. In the second section the author turns to an investigation of the transformation of the dominion metaphor in the Christ Hymn, Col 1:15-20. In the Bible attempts at mediating between God's transcendence and his immanence were pursued along two different paths, either following a Gnostic or Hellenistic Jewish dualistic speculative framework followed by traditional scholarship -Käsemann, Lohse, Schweizer), or within a pantheistic, (panentheistic) monistic framework, Stoicism. Only recently with a different structural analysis leading to the affirmation of the unity of the text, has the second route been pursued (van Kooten, Pizzuto, Balabanski). The latter reveals the rich imagery of the hymn celebrating Christ's role in creation (image of God; firstborn of creation; creator and head of the cosmic body) and in redemption (head of the body, the Church; firstborn of the dead; reconciler of all things) become evident. Both parts of the hymn are kept in balance by the central metaphor linking creation and redemption (in Christ all things hold together), the perfect image for the interconnectedness of all things. The final evaluation points to the great opportunity offered by the Colossian hymn, not only for the search of the right metaphor but equally for formulating an ecotheology. <![CDATA[<b>Prof. Dr. Erich Zenger (5.7.1939 - 4.4.2010)</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300023&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This article continues with the investigation of the dominion metaphor in Gen 1:28 that was published in OTE 23 (2). In the first section the author deals with alternative proposals to this metaphor, namely Earth as voice and the world as God's body. The former suggests an ecojustice hermeneutic as proposed by Norman Habel and the latter suggests a feminist critique as poposed by Sallie McFague. In the second section the author turns to an investigation of the transformation of the dominion metaphor in the Christ Hymn, Col 1:15-20. In the Bible attempts at mediating between God's transcendence and his immanence were pursued along two different paths, either following a Gnostic or Hellenistic Jewish dualistic speculative framework followed by traditional scholarship -Käsemann, Lohse, Schweizer), or within a pantheistic, (panentheistic) monistic framework, Stoicism. Only recently with a different structural analysis leading to the affirmation of the unity of the text, has the second route been pursued (van Kooten, Pizzuto, Balabanski). The latter reveals the rich imagery of the hymn celebrating Christ's role in creation (image of God; firstborn of creation; creator and head of the cosmic body) and in redemption (head of the body, the Church; firstborn of the dead; reconciler of all things) become evident. Both parts of the hymn are kept in balance by the central metaphor linking creation and redemption (in Christ all things hold together), the perfect image for the interconnectedness of all things. The final evaluation points to the great opportunity offered by the Colossian hymn, not only for the search of the right metaphor but equally for formulating an ecotheology. <![CDATA[<b>Book Reviews</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000300024&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This article continues with the investigation of the dominion metaphor in Gen 1:28 that was published in OTE 23 (2). In the first section the author deals with alternative proposals to this metaphor, namely Earth as voice and the world as God's body. The former suggests an ecojustice hermeneutic as proposed by Norman Habel and the latter suggests a feminist critique as poposed by Sallie McFague. In the second section the author turns to an investigation of the transformation of the dominion metaphor in the Christ Hymn, Col 1:15-20. In the Bible attempts at mediating between God's transcendence and his immanence were pursued along two different paths, either following a Gnostic or Hellenistic Jewish dualistic speculative framework followed by traditional scholarship -Käsemann, Lohse, Schweizer), or within a pantheistic, (panentheistic) monistic framework, Stoicism. Only recently with a different structural analysis leading to the affirmation of the unity of the text, has the second route been pursued (van Kooten, Pizzuto, Balabanski). The latter reveals the rich imagery of the hymn celebrating Christ's role in creation (image of God; firstborn of creation; creator and head of the cosmic body) and in redemption (head of the body, the Church; firstborn of the dead; reconciler of all things) become evident. Both parts of the hymn are kept in balance by the central metaphor linking creation and redemption (in Christ all things hold together), the perfect image for the interconnectedness of all things. The final evaluation points to the great opportunity offered by the Colossian hymn, not only for the search of the right metaphor but equally for formulating an ecotheology.