Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Old Testament Essays]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=1010-991920100001&lang=es vol. 23 num. 1 lang. es <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>The Deuteronomist(s)' interpretation of exilic suffering in an African perspective</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000100001&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The question of the identity of the Deuteronomist(s) has been debated and is still in debate. While some believe he was an individual author, editor, or compiler who sought to interpret as honestly as possible the history of Israel in the light of his personal understanding of the crisis that befell Judah, others believe that the Deuteronomists are groups, schools, prophets or scribes. Be that as it may, both Deuteronomistic and African slave theologies of suffering hold similar interpretations of exilic suffering despite the events not being the same. Both interpret their suffering as retributive, divine disciplinary, redemptive, revelational, probational and eschatological. <![CDATA[<b>The relevance of exegetical commentaries on the Septuagint - LXX Proverbs 1:1-7 as an example</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000100002&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This article demonstrates the significance of construing exegetical commentaries of the Septuagint. It takes LXX Proverbs 1:1-7 as a pilot study and employs a contextual method of interpretation. The translator in broad terms followed the structure of the Hebrew of this chapter. Variation was clearly his aim and thus he made significant adjustments on a syntactical level, as well as on a stylistic one. Rhyme and alliteration are applied and some passages are harmonised. He used word combinations and contrasts. The theological or exegetical intention of the translator is evident. The first seven verses act as an introduction to the book as a whole and more specifically to chapter 2. In the final analysis these verses are aimed at indicating what true biblical wisdom is. <![CDATA[<b>Genesis 2:18-25 from a Jungian and feminist-deconstructionist point of view</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000100003&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es While there is nothing particularly special about Genesis 2:18-25 as affects language usage and variants that could significantly impact upon its translation, it has become one of the most contentious biblical passages for feminist interpretations of the biblical text. This article investigates Genesis 2:18-25 primarily from the perspective of Jungian individuation theory. It then merges the results of this analysis with the gains made by feminist interpretations of this passage in order further to deconstruct its androcentric application. <![CDATA[<b>L'usage des Psaumes d'Asaph dans la présentation du retour de l'exil en Isaïe 40-52</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000100004&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The presentation of the return from exile in the Book of Isaiah depends of the Psalms of Asaph. But this point prepares a contestation of the doctrine of the deutero-Asaphite psalms particularly regarding the seed of Abraham. In the book of Isaiah one encounters a dispute with regard to the doctrine of the Book of Psalms. <![CDATA[<b>Faire la Theologie de l'Ancien Testament en Afrique aujourd'hui : Défis et perspective</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000100005&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Doing biblical theology today is a difficult, complex and challenging task. The greatest challenge comes from the fact that for more than two centuries, scholars have not been able to agree on what should be called biblical theology and how to go about it. In Africa, the challenge is of a different nature: no single biblical theology on the standard of Brueggemann, Goldingay or Waltke has been produced despite a great interest in biblical studies. This article argues that there are seven important points one needs to consider in doing a relevant biblical theology: the question of the definition, of the centre of biblical theology, of the starting point, of the method, of the relevance, of the content, and the question of the relationship between the Old and the New Testament. <![CDATA[<b>What would Bakhtin say about Isaiah 21:1-12? A re-reading</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000100006&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Employing the Bakhtinian theory of polyphony and dialogism, the following is a re-reading of my previous publication on the same passage.² While the feasibility of uncovering the internal aspects of the Isaian personality has been demonstrated through the first reading, the impact of reading Isaiah 21:1-12 from a Bakhtinian vantage point goes beyond literary, psychological, imaginative, and philosophical lenses to a new angle of perception: the dialogic way of presenting and constructing "truth." On the one hand, the notion of Isaiah 21:1-12 as a polyphonic and dialogic text is established. Yet, on the other hand, there is still no "final word" with regards to the Isaian internal profile. Thus, readers are invited to engage in an ongoing dialogue with both-the author, through Isaiah's self-presentation and projection of his internal profile, and the characters that emerge through the independent unmerged voices of the text. The anticipated result is what Bakhtin sagaciously termed, an "unfinalizable," yet ever expanding and enriching reading on the subject. <![CDATA[<b>Psalm 137: Exile - not the time for singing the Lord's Song</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000100007&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The experience of exile is not confined to the pages of the Bible dealing with the Babylonian exile. Exile is not only a geographical place, but it is a religious state of mind. Although the Jews were geographically displaced, their biggest experience of exile was their loss of the structured, reliable world which provided them with meaning. Exile is thus primarily not a geographical issue, but it is a social, moral, cultural, liturgical and spiritual issue; an understanding that one is in a hostile, alien situation. The purpose of this paper is to analyse Psalm 137 to ascertain what Israel's response was in a time of exile. How did they address the faith crisis of exile ? How did they react to the loss of their world, their temple, their homeland, their security? Did they continue to worship in a strange land, and if so, how? A second purpose of the paper will then be to establish what the proper response of contemporary worshippers during times of exile should be. <![CDATA[<b>Understanding (the lack of) space in Psalm 47:6 in light of its neighbouring Psalms: A spatial reading of Psalms 46-48</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000100008&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Psalm 47 is investigated intertextually with Psalms 46 and 48 in terms of their representation of space to determine to where Yahweh ascends in Psalm 47:6. An overview is also given of the theory of Critical Spatiality as well as an overview of the temple as the navel of the Ancient Near Eastern cosmology and spatial orientation. The spatial correlations of Psalm 46-48, i.e. all three's emphasis on the temple and surroundings, will then aid the interpreter in identifying the space in which Psalm 47 plays off. It is also indicated that Psalms 46-48 can be read as a trilogy as they share the same themes and use the same kind of language. <![CDATA[<b>Ethnicity, cultural diversity and poverty in South Africa: Archaeological perspectives from Iron Age Palestine</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000100009&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Ethnic and cultural intolerance is still alive and well in post-Apartheid South Africa. It impinges negatively on the country's fight against poverty. Recent statistics on poverty in South Africa indicate that poverty is much higher amongst historically disadvantaged groups with no indication of any improvement. To alleviate poverty, foreign investment, amongst others, is crucial. Foreigners will only invest once they see local people are prepared to invest their skills and capital. This is not happening because South Africans from different ethnic background have not acknowledged or made peace with their ethnic diversities. Recent archaeological discoveries from stratum I at Ekron (an ancient Iron Age Philistine city) revealed evidence of Philistines, Judeans and Israelites working together in factories, sharing their capital, knowledge and skills. The author concludes that the seemingly harmonious and prosperous co-existence evident from the discoveries at Ekron, would not have been possible if these groups didn 't somehow managed to accept and tolerate their ethnic diversities and work together to survive under Neo-Assyrian rule. The archaeological evidence from Ekron has revealed valuable perspectives on co-operation between ethnically diverse groups that can assist South Africans in their quest to alleviate poverty. <![CDATA[<b>Daniel's position in the Tanach, the LXX-Vulgate, and the Protestant canon</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000100010&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Starting from the observation that Daniel has different placements in the Tanach, Septuagint, Vulgate, and Protestant Canon, this essay examines the early historical evidence in relation to biblical collections and in particular the placement of Daniel within these collections. The argument is that these various placements are due to the dialogue already present within the Book of Daniel and further continues into the various placements within these different canons. The exegetical significance is found not only in the text being placed among the other texts of the canon, but also through the actual arrangement of these texts (its canonical intertextuality). <![CDATA[<b>Book Reviews</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192010000100011&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Starting from the observation that Daniel has different placements in the Tanach, Septuagint, Vulgate, and Protestant Canon, this essay examines the early historical evidence in relation to biblical collections and in particular the placement of Daniel within these collections. The argument is that these various placements are due to the dialogue already present within the Book of Daniel and further continues into the various placements within these different canons. The exegetical significance is found not only in the text being placed among the other texts of the canon, but also through the actual arrangement of these texts (its canonical intertextuality).