Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Old Testament Essays]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=1010-991920160002&lang=es vol. 29 num. 2 lang. es <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Readers and Context</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192016000200001&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es <![CDATA[<b>Sources, formation and socio-historical context of the Joseph Narrative: Re-examined under the documentary hypothesis</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192016000200002&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The historical-critical method has given birth to many approaches to the study of the Bible. As a consequence, many scholars have come up with solutions to some of the exegetical problems in the Judeo-Chris-tian scriptures. One of the most popular proposed solutions to the problems in the Pentateuch is the Documentary Hypothesis. With time, the findings of the hypothesis have been challenged in reference to some texts in the Pentateuch. This paper seeks to re-examine the sources, formation and the socio-historical context of the Joseph narrative under the Documentary Hypothesis. It evaluates the Joseph narrative under the hypothesis in the light of its critique by later scholars. The essay argues that the narrative is composed of already-existing materials from the Ancient Near East, Egypt and the traditions from Israel to reflect some aspects of the history of Israel in retrospect. Weighing the sources according to the hypothesis as against the views of its critics, who accept the narrative as a unity, one discovers that some traces of source criticism are apparent in the views of the critics of the Documentary Hypothesis. They were solving similar problems within the narrative but from different perspectives. <![CDATA[<b>The Chronicler as a biblical paradigm for a theology of reconstruction in Africa: an exploration of 2 Chronicles 6:32</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192016000200003&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This article responds to a challenge posed by Jesse Mugambi to propose a biblical paradigm for the reconstruction process in Africa. It proposes Chronicles as a biblical paradigm for the reconstruction process in Africa vis-à-vis Nehemiah whom Mugambi proposes. To motivate its proposition, the article examines 2 Chr 6:32. However, to justify its conclusion about 2 Chr 6:32 the article needs to establish that this verse purports the Chronistic theology contrary to the theology of the Vorlage. To do this, the article examines the use of Psalm 132:8-10 in 2 Chr 6:40-42. <![CDATA[<b>The Flood Narratives in Gen 6-9 and Darren Aronofsky's Film "Noah"</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192016000200004&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Since the release of Darren Aronofsky's film "Noah" in 2014, questions have been raised with regard to the relation between the film and the Bible. This article compares the flood stories in Gen 69 and Aronofsky's film "Noah. " Probing some interesting and sig-nificant divergences between these two texts, I argue that the film "Noah " offers a good opportunity to discuss the open nature of the biblical texts, which often stimulates further transformations and interpretations. <![CDATA[<b>The use of priestly legal tradition in Joshua and the composition of the Pentateuch and Joshua</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192016000200005&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This article looks at how priestly legal materials can be seen to have been used in Joshua. This includes the allotment of towns of refuge, levitical towns, the concept of centralization of worship (Joshua 22:934) and the Passover. The argument will be that priestly material has been incorporated in a Deuteronomic framework and that Joshua can be seen as a document that quite uniquely combines Priestly and Deuteronomic legal materials. In this, Deuteronomic legal materials can be considered as encompassing priestly materials from an interpretative perspective, in line with the narrative order of Priestly and Deuteronomic materials in the Pentateuch. Relevant textual issues will also be taken into consideration, such as with the portrayal of the Passover in Joshua. In addition, the article considers issues that relate to theory construction and how they relate to the topic in question. <![CDATA[<b>"I have seen the custom of the King of Egypt in our time as well." A study in comparative Midrash and commentary</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192016000200006&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es This study discusses three major explanations by medieval biblical commentators for Moses's meeting with Pharaoh by the Nile in the early morning hours prior to the plagues of blood and wild beasts. The exegetical principle underlying these interpretations is the view that some royal practices were shared by rulers of ancient Egypt and by medieval Muslim and Christian European rulers. Ibn Ezra claimed that Pharaoh ventured out to check the level of the water, as customary of Muslim sultans in his own time. Ibn Caspi suggests that Moses was asked to meet Pharaoh by the Nile where he was accustomed to holding a ball game with his escorts. It seems that he refers to a game of polo that was very popular among Mamluk kings. Bechor Shor and Hizkuni claimed that Pharaoh would get up early to go hunting using birds of prey. Hunting with birds was a common professional sport among the nobility in medieval times. French commentators used the life style of European nobility and royalty in medieval times to reach conclusions about ancient Egypt. <![CDATA[<b>Searching for Affirming Notions of (African) Manhood in the Paean in Praise of the <i>'</i></b><b>Ēš<i>et </i><i>Ḥayil? </i>One African Woman's Response to Joel K. T. Biwul's Article, "What is He doing at the Gate?"</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192016000200007&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The article challenges the "hi-jacking" of a paean in praise of a female to serve a male agenda. It responds to Biwul's article in OTE 29(1) 2016 in which the author attempts to "resuscitate" what he regarded as the traditionally forgotten male figure in his reading of Proverbs 31:10-31. This article pushes the point that women facing androcentric texts are in need of reading themselves into places where they are not perceived to be present. <![CDATA[<i>The Wiley Blackwell Companion to Ancient Israel</i>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192016000200008&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The article challenges the "hi-jacking" of a paean in praise of a female to serve a male agenda. It responds to Biwul's article in OTE 29(1) 2016 in which the author attempts to "resuscitate" what he regarded as the traditionally forgotten male figure in his reading of Proverbs 31:10-31. This article pushes the point that women facing androcentric texts are in need of reading themselves into places where they are not perceived to be present. <![CDATA[<i>Encyclopedia of the Bible and its Reception 9: Field - Gennesaret</i>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192016000200009&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The article challenges the "hi-jacking" of a paean in praise of a female to serve a male agenda. It responds to Biwul's article in OTE 29(1) 2016 in which the author attempts to "resuscitate" what he regarded as the traditionally forgotten male figure in his reading of Proverbs 31:10-31. This article pushes the point that women facing androcentric texts are in need of reading themselves into places where they are not perceived to be present. <![CDATA[<i>A Commentary on the Psalms</i>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192016000200010&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The article challenges the "hi-jacking" of a paean in praise of a female to serve a male agenda. It responds to Biwul's article in OTE 29(1) 2016 in which the author attempts to "resuscitate" what he regarded as the traditionally forgotten male figure in his reading of Proverbs 31:10-31. This article pushes the point that women facing androcentric texts are in need of reading themselves into places where they are not perceived to be present. <![CDATA[<i>Yakweh's Elegant Speeches of Abrahamic Narratives: A Study of the Stylistics, Characterizations, and Functions of the Divine Speeches in Abrahamic Narratives</i>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192016000200011&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The article challenges the "hi-jacking" of a paean in praise of a female to serve a male agenda. It responds to Biwul's article in OTE 29(1) 2016 in which the author attempts to "resuscitate" what he regarded as the traditionally forgotten male figure in his reading of Proverbs 31:10-31. This article pushes the point that women facing androcentric texts are in need of reading themselves into places where they are not perceived to be present.