Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Old Testament Essays]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=1010-991920180002&lang=en vol. 31 num. 2 lang. en <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Editorial</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192018000200001&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en <![CDATA[<b>The Concept of Philosophy in Post-Apartheid Western Historical Overviews of South African Old Testament Scholarship</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192018000200002&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This article seeks to clarify the concept of "philosophy" as it appeared within popular overviews of South African Old Testament scholarship published in the post-apartheid era. After providing a typology of related research, the discussion proceeds with the identification of the words "philosophy"/"philosophical" in the associated colonialist scholarly discourses. The latter part involves a brief classification, commentary and critique of the meta-philosophical assumptions supervening on the associated intra- and cross-disciplinary contexts. "The secret of theory is that truth does not exist."1 <![CDATA[<b>The Significance of the Rhetorical Ambiguity in Isaiah 54:16</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192018000200003&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The ambiguity in Isa 54:16a concerning the identity of the subject (Yhwh or the smith) of the two verbs relating a metallurgical action (to blow and to cast) is identified here as a rhetorical device intending to conceal the essential relation of YHWH with metallurgy. Integrated in the whole Isa 54 chapter, this device becomes a plea for the definitive replacement of Edom with Israel as yhwh 'speople, exactly as in Isa 34-35 and Isa 61-63. <![CDATA[<b>Patriarchy and Women Abuse: Perspectives from Ancient Israel and Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192018000200004&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en It is often claimed that women abuse inevitably emanates from patriarchy. Using ancient Israel and Africa as contexts, this article assesses the correlation between patriarchy and violence against women. The article suggests in these contexts, it is not all men are who are perpetrators of women abuse; rather, there is evidence of female perpetrators of sexual violence against men; and that in the ancient and modern societies, there is also homosexual violence. Rather than patriarchy, the major cause of women abuse is a personality disorder characterised, among other traits, by aggression against women, alcoholism and drug abuse - the latter two traits are often responsible for women abuse. Being accustomed to domestic violence from youth and low socio-economic status are also causes of women abuse. <![CDATA[<b>Conceptualising the Biblical View of Curse (Gen. 9:25-27) as a Metaphor for Natural Resource Curse in Zimbabwe: An Indigenous Knowledge Systems Perspective</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192018000200005&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The African continent in general, and Zimbabwe in particular, continue to endure the acrimony of "natural resource curse " in spite of an abundance of natural resources. Africa consumes what it does not produce, and produces what it does not consume. The following three contestations constitute the milieu underpinning the present study: (1) the biblical text presents the entire human race as cursed through Adam (Gen. 3:17), (2) that Africans are cursed because they are portrayed as the descendants of Ham 's son, Canaan, who was cursed by his grandparent, Noah (Gen. 9:25-27), and (3) biblical commentators continue to argue for the presence of an African in the biblical context; and Cush, Ham 's eldest son, is perceived as "dark-skinned". In view of the above views, this study argues that a literal reading and interpretation of the Bible presents humans (especially Africans) as cursed. This discourse, therefore, interrogates the biblical concept of curse as a metaphor for curse in Zimbabwe. This argument is raised at the backdrop of Zimbabwe's wealth in natural resources such as land, gold, copper, platinum, nickel, iron, emeralds, and diamonds, among others. In addition, "chituko "/"ngozi " (avenging spirit) among the Shona people of Zimbabwe is also considered as a curse for uncompensated offences. <![CDATA[<b>2 Samuel 23,1-7, en relation avec le Psautier, le Pentateuque et le livre de Malachie en vue de la réaffirmation de David et sa descendance en réponse à leur substitution par Moïse et en lien avec l'influence du livre des Proverbes sur les rédactions bibliques</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192018000200006&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Le texte de 2 S 23,1-7 est à situer dans la continuité de 2 S 22, de même que le Ps 19 dans la continuité du Ps 18, parallèle à 2 S 22. Il faut situer 2 S 23,1-7 dans le cadre d'une réaffirmation messianique davidique comme en Nb 24,17. Cette réaffirmation davidique implique la présentation de l'action de David, comme complétant celle de Moïse, qui a joué un rôle de substitution vis-à-vis de Moïse après l'exil. Cette réaffirmation messianique s'appuie sur des relectures du transfert de l'arche par David. La mention des « fils de Bélial » correspond à une allusion à Ps 18,5 = 2 S 22,5 et au-delà aux livres de Samuel.<hr/>The text of 2 Sam 23:1-7 must be interpreted in the continuity of 2 Sam 22, the same as Ps 19 should be read in the continuity of Ρ s 18, parallel to 2 Sam 22. 2 Sam 23:1-7 must also be understood in the context of a Davidic messianic reaffirmation, as in Num 24:17. This Davidic reaffirmation implies the presentation of David's action as complementing that of Moses, because Moses was first a substitute of the dynasty immediately after the exile. This messianic reaffirmation is based on re-readings of the transfer of the ark by David. The mention of the "sons of Belial" corresponds to an allusion to Ps 18:5 = 2 Sam 22:5, and beyond that to the Books of Samuel. <![CDATA[<b>Translation for and in Performance: Fusion of Horizons of Hebrew psalmist and Zulu Translator-Performer in the Zulu "Performance Arena"</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192018000200007&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This empirical study explores whether indigenous Zulu praise-poetry can inform the translation of biblical praise-psalms. Zulu youth ("poetry fans") were invited to learn about Hebrew and Zulu poetics as well as the process of Bible translation. Then they made their own translations and performances of biblical praise-psalms, following the Literary-rhetorical approach of Ernst Wendland. The results show a strong Zulu imprint from the source to the receptor text, although the original message is retained along with some of the poetic features. The literary and rhetorical power of the Hebrew is transformed into images and thought patterns that come alive to the Zulu mind while still being acceptable (to them) in terms of biblical accuracy. The performances of the translated texts (using rap, song, or spoken poetry) utilise prosody to deliver the message, thus requiring some adjustment to the texts. The audience enters into the experience, impacting the performers. Thus, there are four "voices " apparent: those of the original author, the Zulu translator, the Zulu performer, and the audience. A rich texture of cultural beauty emerges as the Hebrew and Zulu horizons merge in a panorama of literary beauty and rhetorical power. <![CDATA[<b>Translation for and in Performance: Fusion of Horizons of Hebrew psalmist and Zulu Translator-Performer in the Zulu "Performance Arena"</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192018000200007&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This empirical study explores whether indigenous Zulu praise-poetry can inform the translation of biblical praise-psalms. Zulu youth ("poetry fans") were invited to learn about Hebrew and Zulu poetics as well as the process of Bible translation. Then they made their own translations and performances of biblical praise-psalms, following the Literary-rhetorical approach of Ernst Wendland. The results show a strong Zulu imprint from the source to the receptor text, although the original message is retained along with some of the poetic features. The literary and rhetorical power of the Hebrew is transformed into images and thought patterns that come alive to the Zulu mind while still being acceptable (to them) in terms of biblical accuracy. The performances of the translated texts (using rap, song, or spoken poetry) utilise prosody to deliver the message, thus requiring some adjustment to the texts. The audience enters into the experience, impacting the performers. Thus, there are four "voices " apparent: those of the original author, the Zulu translator, the Zulu performer, and the audience. A rich texture of cultural beauty emerges as the Hebrew and Zulu horizons merge in a panorama of literary beauty and rhetorical power. <![CDATA[<b>Pentecostal pacifist impulse and the violent God of the Hebrew Bible: A balancing act of hermeneutics</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192018000200008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Most early Pentecostals took a pacifist stance toward violence and war, based on Jesus ' example of love for the enemies, and relegated human violence promoted as God's will in the Hebrew Bible to a description of broken and sinful human behaviour that was not viewed as normative for Christian behaviour. Since the 1930s and 1940s, Pentecostals adopted Evangelicals ' hermeneutic, and inter alia their Augustinian just war doctrine and support for nationalism and patriotism. It is argued that a new hermeneutic consensus that has been developing among Pentecostal scholars since the 1970s requires that pacifism should be placed on the Pentecostal agenda because it recognises that the Bible does not speak in a monosyllabic way; the Hebrew Bible contains conflicting views on violence that cannot be systematised into a clearly uniform "biblical view. " <![CDATA[<b>James, Joshua T. 2017. <i>The Storied Ethics of the Thanksgiving Psalms </i>(Library of Hebrew Bible <i>I </i>Old Testament Studies 658). </b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192018000200009&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Most early Pentecostals took a pacifist stance toward violence and war, based on Jesus ' example of love for the enemies, and relegated human violence promoted as God's will in the Hebrew Bible to a description of broken and sinful human behaviour that was not viewed as normative for Christian behaviour. Since the 1930s and 1940s, Pentecostals adopted Evangelicals ' hermeneutic, and inter alia their Augustinian just war doctrine and support for nationalism and patriotism. It is argued that a new hermeneutic consensus that has been developing among Pentecostal scholars since the 1970s requires that pacifism should be placed on the Pentecostal agenda because it recognises that the Bible does not speak in a monosyllabic way; the Hebrew Bible contains conflicting views on violence that cannot be systematised into a clearly uniform "biblical view. " <![CDATA[<b>John Goldingay. <i>Reading Jesus's Bible: How the New Testament Helps Us Understand the Old Testament.</i></b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192018000200010&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Most early Pentecostals took a pacifist stance toward violence and war, based on Jesus ' example of love for the enemies, and relegated human violence promoted as God's will in the Hebrew Bible to a description of broken and sinful human behaviour that was not viewed as normative for Christian behaviour. Since the 1930s and 1940s, Pentecostals adopted Evangelicals ' hermeneutic, and inter alia their Augustinian just war doctrine and support for nationalism and patriotism. It is argued that a new hermeneutic consensus that has been developing among Pentecostal scholars since the 1970s requires that pacifism should be placed on the Pentecostal agenda because it recognises that the Bible does not speak in a monosyllabic way; the Hebrew Bible contains conflicting views on violence that cannot be systematised into a clearly uniform "biblical view. " <![CDATA[<b>Mirjam Zimmermann, Ruben Zimmermann (Hrsg.), <i>Handbuch der Bibeldidaktik.</i></b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1010-99192018000200011&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Most early Pentecostals took a pacifist stance toward violence and war, based on Jesus ' example of love for the enemies, and relegated human violence promoted as God's will in the Hebrew Bible to a description of broken and sinful human behaviour that was not viewed as normative for Christian behaviour. Since the 1930s and 1940s, Pentecostals adopted Evangelicals ' hermeneutic, and inter alia their Augustinian just war doctrine and support for nationalism and patriotism. It is argued that a new hermeneutic consensus that has been developing among Pentecostal scholars since the 1970s requires that pacifism should be placed on the Pentecostal agenda because it recognises that the Bible does not speak in a monosyllabic way; the Hebrew Bible contains conflicting views on violence that cannot be systematised into a clearly uniform "biblical view. "