Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Missionalia]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=0256-950720130001&lang=en vol. 41 num. 1 lang. en <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Editorial</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072013000100001&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en <![CDATA[<b>Migrants, mission and theological education</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072013000100002&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en The Christian Church has faced problems of mission and migrancy from its inception. This paper, however, is limited to southern Africa in the last fifty years, using examples from the Anglican and Orthodox Churches, based mainly on the personal experiences of the author. It begins with the story of a migratory cattle herder in northwestern Namibia who became an evangelist and was trying to plant a church among a nomadic people. There have been other patterns of migration in Southern Africa, including migratory labour, forced removals, refugees, and immigration, both legal and illegal. Theological Education by Extension (TEE), which developed about 40-50 years ago, had the potential to meet some of these needs, though emphasis was often put in the wrong places, so that it did not fulfil the promise of meeting the needs of migrant ministries as well as had been hoped. Materials and resources often had to be improvised, but in many ways much has been achieved. <![CDATA[<b>A network society, social media, migration and mission</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072013000100003&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Human mobility and migration are closely associated with and reciprocally influenced by globalisation. Add the relentless connectivity facilitated by the proliferation of mobile communication and the emergence of social media to this mixture, and an emerging new 'glocal' culture is evident. People are not only migrating to new localities and territories, but simultaneously into a new culture. We are witnessing the greatest mass migration in the history of humanity - from the real to the virtual world. It is a shift from shared space to shared interest. The metaphor of a river in flood has been used to describe the fact that migrant communities are a point of convergence of some of the biggest challenges facing the church and society at large: globalisation, hyperdiversity, interconnectedness, a Google culture and postmodern tribalism. Culture flows like a river and the church functions as a bridge connecting humans striving to make sense of life and Scripture as well as the tradition transmitted over the centuries. Some of the missional challenges will be to incarnate the gospel in this emerging culture. This study was positioned at the convergence of two important processes - the rise of the network society (especially social media) and migration. It took up two of the challenges posed at Edinburgh 2010, namely to "fruitfully" integrate the role of media in modern society into overall missiological thinking, and to think about the "call for a structural reform of the church" to grapple with the challenges of migration. The network society represents a profound social transformation. New technologies deliver connectedness in the palms of our hands and social media serve as an expression of the passion for connection, community and knowing others and being known by others. This research is a theoretical and missiological reflection on the role and importance of social media such as Facebook in migrant communities. It investigated issues such as: • contextualisation and inculturation in a Google culture; • the foundational role of relationships in a network society and migrant culture; • the ability of social media to facilitate connection to the multiple cultural and religious belongings of migrants; • the role of social media to help migrants to find meaning through shared, self generated experiences; • the role of social media in facilitating hospitality to the stranger. <![CDATA[<b>Missionary diaconate: Hope for migrated people</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072013000100004&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en This paper will discuss migration from a missional diaconate ministry with specific focus on koinonia and the importance thereof for the Kingdom, church and society. The point of departure being that migration is not a foreign concept to the Bible or Christianity. From the earliest days in the Old Testament and throughout the Bible, believers in the Trinitarian God are described as "strangers in this world" (1 Peter). The paper will focus on the concepts of kyrugma/mission, diaconia and koinonia, as the three dimensions of mission (Kritzinger 1998:34-36) and the relation between them. Lastly, the missionary deaconate as a ministry of hope is discussed. <![CDATA[<b>"To flee or not to flee": Responses to persecution and the issue of relocation</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072013000100005&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en Religious persecution of believers contributes to migration and relocation. Three alternative responses to persecution or the threat of persecution can be discerned in Scripture: Avoiding, resisting, and enduring for those affected, and mandatory solidarity for the rest of the body of Christ. Advocacy and mission agencies are faced with the question whether relocation of persecuted believers is a viable option and provides a long-term holistic solution. The results of the discussion of a working group on the issues faced by Christian believers of Muslim background in the Middle East on the pros and cons of relocation within a country, within a region, outside a region are presented. <![CDATA[<b>Gender, narratives, and religious competition among the Sonjo of Tanzania</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072013000100006&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en For about sixty years, Christian mission has encountered the resistant Sonjo traditions, and much of the competition between religions has happened in the realm of narratives. Sonjo myths and stories change according to the religio-political needs, and Christians make use of stories or versions of myths that gain them leverage against the traditional religion. Christian mission attempts to utilize women's position as an argument for its benefit. Sonjo Christian women, finding themselves between two patriarchies, the traditional and the Christian, negotiate themselves additional moving space by positioning themselves usually in accordance to churches' positions but sometimes to the Sonjo traditions. <![CDATA[<b>Writing religious history: The historiography of Ethiopian Pentecostalism</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072013000100007&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en For about sixty years, Christian mission has encountered the resistant Sonjo traditions, and much of the competition between religions has happened in the realm of narratives. Sonjo myths and stories change according to the religio-political needs, and Christians make use of stories or versions of myths that gain them leverage against the traditional religion. Christian mission attempts to utilize women's position as an argument for its benefit. Sonjo Christian women, finding themselves between two patriarchies, the traditional and the Christian, negotiate themselves additional moving space by positioning themselves usually in accordance to churches' positions but sometimes to the Sonjo traditions. <![CDATA[<b>Equipping for service: Christian leadership in church and society</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072013000100008&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en For about sixty years, Christian mission has encountered the resistant Sonjo traditions, and much of the competition between religions has happened in the realm of narratives. Sonjo myths and stories change according to the religio-political needs, and Christians make use of stories or versions of myths that gain them leverage against the traditional religion. Christian mission attempts to utilize women's position as an argument for its benefit. Sonjo Christian women, finding themselves between two patriarchies, the traditional and the Christian, negotiate themselves additional moving space by positioning themselves usually in accordance to churches' positions but sometimes to the Sonjo traditions. <![CDATA[<b>Introducing world Christianity</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072013000100009&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en For about sixty years, Christian mission has encountered the resistant Sonjo traditions, and much of the competition between religions has happened in the realm of narratives. Sonjo myths and stories change according to the religio-political needs, and Christians make use of stories or versions of myths that gain them leverage against the traditional religion. Christian mission attempts to utilize women's position as an argument for its benefit. Sonjo Christian women, finding themselves between two patriarchies, the traditional and the Christian, negotiate themselves additional moving space by positioning themselves usually in accordance to churches' positions but sometimes to the Sonjo traditions. <![CDATA[<b>Protestant missions and local encouters in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: Unto the ends of the world</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072013000100010&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en For about sixty years, Christian mission has encountered the resistant Sonjo traditions, and much of the competition between religions has happened in the realm of narratives. Sonjo myths and stories change according to the religio-political needs, and Christians make use of stories or versions of myths that gain them leverage against the traditional religion. Christian mission attempts to utilize women's position as an argument for its benefit. Sonjo Christian women, finding themselves between two patriarchies, the traditional and the Christian, negotiate themselves additional moving space by positioning themselves usually in accordance to churches' positions but sometimes to the Sonjo traditions. <![CDATA[<b>Foundations for mission</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072013000100011&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en For about sixty years, Christian mission has encountered the resistant Sonjo traditions, and much of the competition between religions has happened in the realm of narratives. Sonjo myths and stories change according to the religio-political needs, and Christians make use of stories or versions of myths that gain them leverage against the traditional religion. Christian mission attempts to utilize women's position as an argument for its benefit. Sonjo Christian women, finding themselves between two patriarchies, the traditional and the Christian, negotiate themselves additional moving space by positioning themselves usually in accordance to churches' positions but sometimes to the Sonjo traditions. <![CDATA[<b>Supporting Asian Christianity's transition from mission to church: A history of the Foundation for theological education in south east Asia</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072013000100012&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en For about sixty years, Christian mission has encountered the resistant Sonjo traditions, and much of the competition between religions has happened in the realm of narratives. Sonjo myths and stories change according to the religio-political needs, and Christians make use of stories or versions of myths that gain them leverage against the traditional religion. Christian mission attempts to utilize women's position as an argument for its benefit. Sonjo Christian women, finding themselves between two patriarchies, the traditional and the Christian, negotiate themselves additional moving space by positioning themselves usually in accordance to churches' positions but sometimes to the Sonjo traditions. <![CDATA[<b>Handbook of theological education in world Christianity: Theological perspectives, ecumenical trends, regional surveys</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072013000100013&lng=en&nrm=iso&tlng=en For about sixty years, Christian mission has encountered the resistant Sonjo traditions, and much of the competition between religions has happened in the realm of narratives. Sonjo myths and stories change according to the religio-political needs, and Christians make use of stories or versions of myths that gain them leverage against the traditional religion. Christian mission attempts to utilize women's position as an argument for its benefit. Sonjo Christian women, finding themselves between two patriarchies, the traditional and the Christian, negotiate themselves additional moving space by positioning themselves usually in accordance to churches' positions but sometimes to the Sonjo traditions.