Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Missionalia]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=0256-950720160001&lang=pt vol. 44 num. 1 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Editorial</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072016000100001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Hope in the midst of death: Charismatic spirituality, healing evangelists and the Ebola crisis in Sierra Leone</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072016000100002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The Ebola crisis that crippled West Africa from December 2013 onwards is a watershed moment in the medical history of those nations. Ebola profoundly impacted the regions inadequate healthcare, obstructed the potential for socioeconomic development, and challenged long held traditional and religious beliefs. As the tragedy deepened, the world could not stand idly by and observe poor post-war nations being overwhelmed by a colossal health catastrophe. By the time Ebola was contained, this obnoxious monster had taken an estimated 11,315 lives in the three worst affected countries. Even though medical connoisseurs were at the forefront of the battle, healing evangelists drawing inspiration from Scripture, African culture and Charismatic spirituality, also provided perspectives in the fight against Ebola. This article reviews the response of healing evangelists and discusses how the overall spirituality of Charismatic Movements inspired hope in the midst of death. <![CDATA[<b>Abode in heaven: Paul and life after death in 2 Corinthians 5:1-10</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072016000100003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt In 2 Corinthians 5:1-10, Paul uses different methods to explain his view on life after death. He uses the metaphors of a tent, a building, clothing and being at home with God. It is clear that Paul accepted that the future with God is certain and that he will receive a building from God in heaven even though he may die. There is life with God even before the final resurrection. A life of bliss is assured for those who believe in God. This has implications for missions, namely that the future with God is ascertained. <![CDATA[<b>Christian mission in creative tension with African worldview(s): A post-colonial engagement regarding life after deat and ancestry</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072016000100004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Christian mission in African context, especially in the post-colonial era, can no longer afford to turn a blind eye to the fact that it co-exists with the African traditional religion(s). This article deals with the creative tension that exists betweenChristian mission and African worldview(s) in the area of life after death. In this article we presuppose more than a mere dialogue between ideas or individuals or denominations, but the encounter of different praxes. This article concludes that the dead in the worldviews are not dead; they continue to live in a different form am they continue to speak from the grave even though their praxes differ. <![CDATA[<b>The Christian churches, the state, and genocide in Rwanda</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072016000100005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The churches in Rwanda have exercised considerable political influence during both the colonial and post-colonial periods. Although formally autonomous institutions subordinate to the state, in actuality they have cultivated political influence through their religious teachings and secular role as the loci of material and social resources. However, there is at least one key factor, which has contributed to their fluctuating political influence within Rwanda. During the colonial period, the dominant Catholic Church functioned within a colonial regime of indirect rule, predicated on sustaining the political authority of a Tutsi-dominated Central Court presiding over the territories roughly contiguous with the present-day republic. This threefold division of power and authority acted as a brake upon the hegemonic ambitions of the Church, the royal house and the colonial administrators. Following the abolition of the monarchy in 1961, the structure of political power and authority of the state was fundamentally transformed, clearing the way for the emergence of a 'state church' whose political role in the two Hutu dominated post-colonial republics would have significant historical implications. In this essay, I argue that it was this structural transformation of the Rwandan polity - marking the shift from a trilateral to a dual relationship between state and Church -, which contributes to our understanding of how the Church became embroiled in the mass violence and genocide in the twentieth century Rwandan polity <![CDATA[<b>"Who'll be a witness for my Lord?": Witnessing as an ecclesiological and missiological paradigm</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072016000100006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The Christian church's expansive zeal has often, throughout its history, walked hand-in-hand with the colonial pursuits of empires and nation-states. This cooperative approach between church and empire, which has been described as a Christendom or Constantinian paradigm, has not only implicated the church in the oppression and violent exploitation of people, but, because this paradigm has shaped the church's ecclesial and missiological imagination, such violent and oppressive tendencies are perpetuated. This paper will argue that, in order to break free from such an understanding, we need to reimagine how we understand our ecclesial being and missional purpose. In remembering what it means to be "witnesses" of Jesus Christ in the early church, an understanding which, because of the lifestyle it required, was intimately connected with the very real possibility of becoming a martyr, we are challenged by this alternative paradigm to reimagine our ecclesial being and missional purpose. This alternative imagination, based on a self-sacrificial paradigm of power, changes the very nature and "witness" of the church and its mission. <![CDATA[<b>Missionising youth identity crisis: Towards a missional hermeneutic of coping in youth ministry practice</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072016000100007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The intention of this paper is to interpret the ontological conditions of youth² identity³crisis missionally. This is first done by conceptualising identity crisis as a psychological phenomenon using frameworks of authenticity and attachment to explain the impact of early attachment abuse, abandonment depression, attachment-anxiety with God, and self-regulation on the identity formation of the youth. Secondly, the paper introduces a missional hermeneutic that provides an interpretative framework for coping with the crises4 of identity amongst young people. A missional hermeneutic for coping with the crisis of identity formation, therefore, elaborates on the missional basis of biblical interpretation as a powerful framework within which to interpret a skewed, conflicted identity. The author herewith proposes a missional opportunity that can activate the missional consciousness of young people in their time of crisis and identity formation. Furthermore, the author insists that this missional methodology can be a very useful strategy for producing therapeutic change in young people and can help youth ministry workers and pastoral caregivers to reframe the crisis of youth identity formation from the perspective of 'missio Dei'. <![CDATA[<b>Book Reviews</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072016000100008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The intention of this paper is to interpret the ontological conditions of youth² identity³crisis missionally. This is first done by conceptualising identity crisis as a psychological phenomenon using frameworks of authenticity and attachment to explain the impact of early attachment abuse, abandonment depression, attachment-anxiety with God, and self-regulation on the identity formation of the youth. Secondly, the paper introduces a missional hermeneutic that provides an interpretative framework for coping with the crises4 of identity amongst young people. A missional hermeneutic for coping with the crisis of identity formation, therefore, elaborates on the missional basis of biblical interpretation as a powerful framework within which to interpret a skewed, conflicted identity. The author herewith proposes a missional opportunity that can activate the missional consciousness of young people in their time of crisis and identity formation. Furthermore, the author insists that this missional methodology can be a very useful strategy for producing therapeutic change in young people and can help youth ministry workers and pastoral caregivers to reframe the crisis of youth identity formation from the perspective of 'missio Dei'.