Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Missionalia]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=0256-950720160002&lang=pt vol. 44 num. 2 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Editorial</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072016000200001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Evangelicalism in Africa. What it is and what it does</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072016000200002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Evangelicalism is experiencing spectacular growth on the African continent. However definitions of Evangelicalism continue to be dominated by a western understanding of the phenomenon. An African understanding of Evangelicalism as well as African examples need to feature in discussions of the topic. Evangelicalism in Africa should be understood more by what it does for its adherents than by its doctrinal formulations. Its success on the sub-continent of Africa could be due to the fact that it transacts at the interface of a modern and pre-modern worldview. It meets the needs that an African condition creates and opens the way to what a modern condition demands. It resonates both with the spirituality of Africa and the materialism and individualism of modernity and provides its adherents the sense of agency demanded in the modern world but which is opaque and complex in an African universe. It translates in various and diverse ways, both positively and negatively, into the social, economic, and political structures of African society. <![CDATA[<b>Migration and mission. According to the book of Acts</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072016000200003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt After a brief survey of migration in the Bible, this article examines migration - be it voluntary or enforced - in the Book of Acts. Acts describes in Stephen's speech in surprising detail experiences of migration in Israel's past and its theological implications. According to Acts, many early Christian missionaries served in places that were not their places of origin, voluntarily or by force: the disciples ended up in Jerusalem and eventually at the ends of the earth. Others had come to Jerusalem from elsewhere even before encountering the Gospel and ministered throughout the Eastern Mediterranean world as they became involved in mission. Early Christian mission is closely related to migration and dislocation, voluntary or by force, led by the Spirit and for the sake of the Gospel. Repeatedly missionaries had to flee in order to avoid persecution. Despite the tragedy and suffering involved, there were also great opportunities, which were readily seized: the Gospel moved forward. A final section reflects on the significance of this portrayal for the church and its mission in the 21st century. <![CDATA[<b>An Adamic incarnational Christological framework as a theological approach for African contextual ministry</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072016000200004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Many African Christian thinkers and writers are responding to the foreignness of Christ in African Christianity by treating Christ under the traditional African ancestral category. However, it is our contention that the designation of the ancestral category to Christ has a tendency of diminishing the actuality of Christ as God incarnate and encouraging syncretism in African Christianity. Given this, this article proposes and formulates an Adamic incarnational Christological model as an alternative response to the foreignness of Christ in African Christianity. In employing the anhypostastic and enhypostastic principles, we demonstrate that Jesus Christ is not a foreigner to African Christians, since the human nature he assumed in the incarnation is a general human nature which embraces all humankind. In establishing the Adam-Christ relationship in Romans 5:12-21 and 1 Corinthians 15:21-22, we advance Adam as a biblical-theological category in enhancing the relevance of Christ to Africans. It is from this perspective that our Adamic incarnational Christological model proposes that in the incarnation, God in Christ fully identified with all mankind as the New Adam, acting from the ontological depth of his divine-human existence to save African Christians from sin and all its consequences, including death and opposing spiritual forces. Thus, our own model underscores the relevance of Christ to African Christians by emphasizing Christ's complete solidarity with all humanity as the New Adam. <![CDATA[<b>So that we might become the righteousness and justice of God. Re-examining the gospel in 2 Cor 5:21 for the church's contribution to a better world</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072016000200005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This article interprets Paul's summary of the gospel in 2 Cor 5:21 as saying that Christ died so that believers might be transformed into God's righteousness (not onl deemed as righteous by God). The article explains the powerfully generative nature of God's righteousness and then demonstrates that dikaiosunë also means justice. The interpretation of 2 Cor 5:21 clarifies that the gospel Christians believe for salvation also transforms them to embody God's righteousness and justice. This enlarged angle on Paul's view of the gospel serves as a basis for teaching a seamless continu ity between believing in Jesus Christ and becoming a force for justice in the world. <![CDATA[<b>Creative tensions in mission. Bosch 25 years on</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072016000200006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This article interprets Paul's summary of the gospel in 2 Cor 5:21 as saying that Christ died so that believers might be transformed into God's righteousness (not onl deemed as righteous by God). The article explains the powerfully generative nature of God's righteousness and then demonstrates that dikaiosunë also means justice. The interpretation of 2 Cor 5:21 clarifies that the gospel Christians believe for salvation also transforms them to embody God's righteousness and justice. This enlarged angle on Paul's view of the gospel serves as a basis for teaching a seamless continu ity between believing in Jesus Christ and becoming a force for justice in the world. <![CDATA[<b>Youth intervention through training and equipping in the midst of challenges and crisis. The LIFEPLAN® programme as a possible solution</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072016000200007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The youth in contemporary South Africa seems to face massive challenges and experience problems such as substance use and drug abuse, violence, rape, child trafficking, prostitution, etc., lead to the lives of many young people being destroyed. Farming communities in the Christiana district of the North-West Province of South Africa struggle with poverty, unemployment, alcoholism, violence, occultism and Satanism. Statistics indicate a drastic decline in morals, values, standards, ethics, character and behaviour and society seems to indulge in crisis after crisis. Millions of young people growing up as orphans and even more, without a father figure in their lives, declining education in the schools and frustration with massive unemployment among those who have left school. This article focused on the youth of the Christiana district of South Africa as a large harvest to be reaped through holistic missional outreach programs that will give hope and enrich the lives of young people. The article also aimed to emphasize the LIFEPLAN® programme in a constructive creative critical way from a missio Dei perspective. Going missional², and using in this context a programme require shifts in one's thinking and behaviour. <![CDATA[<b>Towards a theology of development in the Uniting Reformed Church in Southern Africa (URCSA). Embodying Article 4 of the Belhar Confession</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072016000200008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The Belhar Confession gained shape following the social injustices that resulted from the policy of apartheid. Whilst the former mission church's role during the apartheid regime was that of resistance, its role in a post-apartheid South African context was supposed to change to reconstruction and assistance. Given the current socioeconomic situation and injustices, the Belhar Confession is now more than ever relevant and should therefore be the basis and motivation for the church to serve and be involved in the fight against poverty in South Africa. The church is therefore challenged to not solely depend on welfare projects in their role as poverty combat-ers but to move beyond a charity mode towards a mode of development. <![CDATA[<b>Book Reviews</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072016000200009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The Belhar Confession gained shape following the social injustices that resulted from the policy of apartheid. Whilst the former mission church's role during the apartheid regime was that of resistance, its role in a post-apartheid South African context was supposed to change to reconstruction and assistance. Given the current socioeconomic situation and injustices, the Belhar Confession is now more than ever relevant and should therefore be the basis and motivation for the church to serve and be involved in the fight against poverty in South Africa. The church is therefore challenged to not solely depend on welfare projects in their role as poverty combat-ers but to move beyond a charity mode towards a mode of development.