Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Missionalia]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=0256-950720170001&lang=pt vol. 45 num. 1 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Editorial</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072017000100001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Reflection on glocal worship in missiology in the context of the marginalised, yet never silenced, black African worship music from missio Dei perspective</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072017000100002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This article reflects the glocal worship challenges in missiology in the context of the marginalised, yet never silenced, black African worship music. As a minister in the innercity of Hillbrow Johannesburg the researcher met and lived with many marginalised Black Africans. The concept, 'glocalisation' helped him to reflect more on the contestation between the official Western Psalters and hymnodies and the unofficial black African (free) worship songs. In the contestation the black African worship song are marginalised, yet they are not silenced. In this regard, the researcher became aware of the fact that the contestation is actually between the Western and African socio-historical settings or contexts of their respective worship song tunes and styles and hence not necessarily based on biblical principle. This finding pave the way toward the handling of the contestation and also towards addressing glocal worship in missiology as one of the Church's missional calling to the marginalised people today. <![CDATA[<b>The role of personhood in development: An African perspective on development in South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072017000100003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The question that this article addresses is the role of personhood in development in post-Apartheid South Africa. Modernisation and Dependency theories have not been successful in the development of South Africa over the past two decades. The gap between rich and poor has widened and South Africa was on the verge of being declared junk status. An approach that considers personhood from an African perspective can lead to more effective development. Effective development that is less dependent and exploitative can emerge from theological markers such as the Trinitarian God, relationship with the other and vulnerability. <![CDATA[<b>A Comparative Discourse on Christian and Secular Distinctive: Features of Transformational Development</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072017000100004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The primary objective of this article is to explore some distinctions between Christian and secular views of transformation, characteristics of transformational development and the holistic practitioner. To meet this aim, relevant literature has been explored. The article argues that the Christian's development motivation, goal and process are distinctive. The affirmation of indigenous knowledge; peaceful relationships, self-worth, empowerment and spiritual development are basic characteristics of transformational development. The paper also insists that the attitudes and characteristics of a holistic practitioner play a crucial role in realising these characteristics of transformational development. Understanding the value of this could assist faith-based organization and church-based development agency staff in engaging holistically. <![CDATA[<b>The making of Allan Aubrey Boesak: Theologian and political activist</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072017000100005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Although no conventional biography of Allan Boesak has been published, either by himself or others, as far as we are aware, we have enough data and information in various places to make small beginnings of the long overdue task. Boesak's phenomenal contribution to political theology, black theology and ecumenism both in South Africa and internationally, deserves deliberate acknowledgement. In this essay, we attempt an appraisal of the contribution of Allan Boesak to politics and theology by focusing on key milestones and reflections in his life. We take our cue from Boesak's own self-definition of being a theologian and a political activist and proceed to explore some of the roots and sources of his theology and political activism. <![CDATA[<b>Conversions in context: Insights from an autobiographical narrative of a Congolese-born missionary at Stinkwater</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072017000100006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Indigenous African missionaries are increasingly becoming involved in various mission interests in their contexts. Assumptions made by many mission institutions are that when they call indigenous Africans, they would be easily accepted and integrated into the community and get on with mission duties. However, these assumptions do not hold for indigenous Africans who are not native to the land where they serve. In relation to the latter this article, based on an autobiographical narrative of a Congolese-born missionary at Stinkwater, highlights four 'conversion episodes' that the missionary went through before he begun to 'weave together' the story of the good news of Jesus with stories of people in this particular context. All these episodes have had profound implications towards reshaping and reviving his theology of mission and praxis at Stinkwater. Insights from this autobiographical narrative could be useful in the preparation of indigenous workers who intend to work in context where they are not native to the land. <![CDATA[<b>Book Reviews</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0256-95072017000100007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Indigenous African missionaries are increasingly becoming involved in various mission interests in their contexts. Assumptions made by many mission institutions are that when they call indigenous Africans, they would be easily accepted and integrated into the community and get on with mission duties. However, these assumptions do not hold for indigenous Africans who are not native to the land where they serve. In relation to the latter this article, based on an autobiographical narrative of a Congolese-born missionary at Stinkwater, highlights four 'conversion episodes' that the missionary went through before he begun to 'weave together' the story of the good news of Jesus with stories of people in this particular context. All these episodes have had profound implications towards reshaping and reviving his theology of mission and praxis at Stinkwater. Insights from this autobiographical narrative could be useful in the preparation of indigenous workers who intend to work in context where they are not native to the land.