Scielo RSS <![CDATA[Tydskrif vir Letterkunde]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=0041-476X20160001&lang=pt vol. 53 num. 1 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Cameroon's national literatures: An introduction</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Anglophone Cameroon literature: A conversation with Bole Butake</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Francophone Cameroon literature: A conversation with Ambroise Kom</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Writing in Cameroon, the first hundred years</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt German, French and British colonization, the advent of Christian missions, the fight for independence and the subsequent neocolonial régime, impacted greatly on the literature produced in Cameroon between 1889 and 1989. These factors determined where writers studied, the gender of those who did study, the European languages they used, the purposes for which they wrote, as well as where they were published and read. Witnesses to the absurdity and abuses of several colonial masters as well as a variety of approaches to Christianity, Cameroonians' skepticism was evident in the oppositional stance that writers took in their fictional works. Early writers' attention to the status of women anticipated some of the themes women writers would later use to denounce the impact of tradition, patriarchy and poverty on the lives of women. Later fiction revealed the post-independence restrictions on Cameroon's progress towards freedom. In the process, Cameroonian writers made the French language theirs, adapting it to reflect the world they wrote about. <![CDATA[<b>'Anthropological mutilation' and the reordering of Cameroonian literature</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt I argue in this article that the postcolonial existential wound, otherwise referred to by Eboussi Boulaga as the anthropological mutilation, represents the intertextual nexus that bridges the generational gap in Francophone Cameroonian literature. The tragic malaise, rooted in absurdity and the dire state of the postcolonial condition, echoes anxieties expressed by earlier generations of Cameroonian writers in the 1950s about engaged literature. The article is therefore an exercise in detecting commonalities and discontinuities that weave a shared national literary tradition. Among the commonalities, the presence of jazz, the writing of the anticolonial struggle stand out while innovations are to be found in the epidemic manifestation of madness and the disintegration of the basic social fabric visible in the form of incest. <![CDATA[<b>'Anthropological mutilation' and the reordering of Cameroonian literature</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt I argue in this article that the postcolonial existential wound, otherwise referred to by Eboussi Boulaga as the anthropological mutilation, represents the intertextual nexus that bridges the generational gap in Francophone Cameroonian literature. The tragic malaise, rooted in absurdity and the dire state of the postcolonial condition, echoes anxieties expressed by earlier generations of Cameroonian writers in the 1950s about engaged literature. The article is therefore an exercise in detecting commonalities and discontinuities that weave a shared national literary tradition. Among the commonalities, the presence of jazz, the writing of the anticolonial struggle stand out while innovations are to be found in the epidemic manifestation of madness and the disintegration of the basic social fabric visible in the form of incest. <![CDATA[<b>Anglophone Cameroon literature 1959-90: A brief overview</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This article examines modern Anglophone Cameroon literature from 1 959 to 1990. The article argues that like most literature emanating from the continent a proper understanding of Anglophone Cameroon literature must be predicated on an analysis of its specific socio-historical determinants. A careful analysis of the corpus of Anglophone Cameroon literature from its inception to the 1 990s reveals two broad phases. The first phase covers the period from 1959 to about 1984. In the Republic of Cameroon, this period begins shortly before 'the end' of colonialism to the rise of Paul Biya as the second president of Cameroon. The writers during this period like their counterparts elsewhere in Africa, critique the 'othering' of formerly colonized people in texts written by the colonizers. To counteract this marginalization, and as a vital part of the process of decolonization, these texts seek to give voice to the 'subaltern' in order to expose the misrepresentation and 'negativization' so rampant in colonial writings. The second phase of Anglophone Cameroon literature started in the mid-eighties and reached its apex in the 1990s. The literature of this period is an imaginative response to the political, social, and economic climate of this time. The article concludes that the 1980s and 1990s were pivotal decades for Anglophone Cameroon literature. The lack of publishing opportunities abroad and at home led authors to be very industrious and ingenuous. They tailored their literary style and genre to the taste of their home audience. The result was an engaging literature that responded directly to the political, social and economic climate of the time. <![CDATA[<b>Framing homosexual identities in Cameroonian literature</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt What language exists to describe the lives of women and sexual minorities who live in Cameroon? In this paper, I demonstrate how a selection of contemporary works of fiction use their narratives to create a space and language for the experiences of LGBT individuals within the cultural imaginary of Sub-Saharan Africa. Texts such as my own Jeune fille de Bona Mbella (2010), Max Lobe's 39 Rue de Berne (2013) and Chimamanda Adichie's "Jumping Monkey Hill" describe the personal lives of both women and sexual minorities, and show how their experiences are intertwined with socio-political realities. I give close attention to the stories' different possible meanings, and place them in their socio-historical contexts in order to make an important intervention into the literary history of Cameroon: LGBT work must be included in our discussions of contemporary Cameroonian cultural production. It is part of our modernity. <![CDATA[<b>'A crushing curse': Widowhood in contemporary Anglophone Cameroon literature</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Moving from the premise that widows have been at the margins of literary discourse in Cameroon, this paper examines widowhood in contemporary Anglophone Cameroon literature using John Nkemngong Nkengasong's The Widow's Might (2006) and Alobwed'Epie's Patching the Broken Dream (2012) as the springboard for its discussion. It argues that the factors that influence the lives of widows, especially, the options available to them and the multiplicity of interests touching on their behavior are grounded in socio-cultural parameters that shape communal consciousness. The paper equally aims at showing how these widows attempt to or actually construct new worlds for themselves by resisting such dominant cultural scripts. The paper locates its discourse within the framework of womanist ideology as propounded by Chikwenye Okonjo Ogunyemi and Mary Modupe Kalawole. <![CDATA[<b>Community theatre as instrument for community sensitisation and mobilisation</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100010&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Environmental protection, sustainable economic development and good governance are important issues of the century, and theatre can play an important role in addressing them. This paper contends that community theatre is likely to offer a sustainable alternative approach towards addressing these and other current myriad issues confronting the African continent. Recognising that rural communities are proactive agents of change, their exclusion from the design, development and implementation of community theatre activities, coupled with the difficulties in sourcing and securing funding for the promotion of conventional theatre activities, are only a few of the problems likely to be encountered. The paper highlights some of the potential implementation constraints and proposes strategies that could be deployed to effectively develop and establish community theatre as part of the African traditional system with a view to influencing change at all levels of the community in particular and the nation at large. <![CDATA[<b>Oral history, collective memory and socio-political criticism: A study of popular culture in Cameroon</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100011&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The growing popularity of contemporary Cameroonian popular cultural production is a significant indication of the value attached to the medium as well as the appreciation of the opportunity offered by the Biya regime. As opposed to the Ahidjo era, Cameroonian popular cultural products today are preoccupied with the daily concerns of the society at large and the masses in particular who have appropriated the art, with its evolving thematic and stylistic focus, thereby making it suitable as a veritable avenue for the representation of voices. Also considered as new forms of oral literature, pop culture owes invaluable contribution to public social discourse. There is no denying therefore that the present form of popular culture is a hybrid of folk or traditional art customized in step with the exigencies of contemporary Cameroonian society. This paper articulates the relationship between historico-social reality and popular culture showing how Cameroonian popular cultural musicians use history and social realities as raw material for the configuration of creative ideology. It further demonstrates that without forfeiting artistic grandeur, popular culture acts as a reservoir of memory, collective experience and sociopolitical criticism. <![CDATA[<b>Towards a poetics of decolonization: Mongo Beti's <i>The Poor Christ of Bomba</i></b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100012&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The Poor Christ of Bomba (1956), Mongo Beti's major novel, depicts the effects of French colonial infringement on the Cameroon landscape and consciousness. The novel charts the story of Father Superior Drumont, a Catholic priest assigned to the rainforest region of Cameroon around the 1930s. His professed task is to convert the indigenes of a six-tribe region to Catholicism. Despite Father Drumont's seeming piety, he is not what he seems. Governed by the French colonial ideology of assimilation, he is bent on forcing his Christian converts to forsake their African traditions and cultural ways as a condition for Christianity. The sixa, a church establishment aimed at grooming young female converts in preparation for Christian marriage, is Father Drumont's signature project during his twenty-year tenure at the Bomba Mission. In practice, however, the sixa is a complete mockery of Catholicism and a subversion of African traditional marriages. Father Drumont's increasingly rebellious converts come into a full awareness of his complicity with French colonial administrators like Vidal. Unable to re-establish a strong foothold in a resistant parish, a disillusioned Father Drumont returns to France. The novel depicts an awakening of a growing "national" consciousness similar to the Harlem Renaissance that occurred in the United States in the early twentieth century. Just as slave narratives exposed the brutality of slavery as a means to promote abolition, this essay explores The Poor Christ of Bomba as a fictional slave narrative that exposes French imperialism by constructing a discourse of resistance that is bound to serve as a path to decolonization. <![CDATA[<b>Nathalie Etoke's bipolar narratives of doomed national romance</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100013&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Nathalie Etoke's novels Un amour sans papiers (1999) and Je vois du soleil dans tes yeux (2008) deal with the hardships of the African postcolonial condition in the global era through the trope of doomed romance. In these novels, the plight of the postcolonial nation-state drives people to emigrate in a search for more viable prospects. While the mobility theme addressed in her novels is typical of third-generation African literatures in general, Etoke's vision simultaneously struggles against the postnationalist currents informing this literary paradigm. Indeed, Etoke's novels are quite loud and didactic in their articulations of political commitment towards the nation and the continent. Etoke holds on to the anticolonial romance narrative, but at the same time cannot ignore its inevitable failures in the present. This leads to a tension that marks her work by giving it a bipolar character, one that manifests itself in the constant oscillation between utopianism and disillusionment. The bipolar quality of the texts betrays a discomfort that the narratives' promotion of an anticolonial struggle for nationhood and decolonisation generate in a postcolonial era that keeps witnessing the failures of these romantic discourses to realise themselves. A close reading of the novels reveals that this discomfort finds its articulation in the narrative fabric of the texts. <![CDATA[<b>The Dutch translations of francophone Cameroon novels</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100014&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt In the corpus of African francophone novels that have been translated into Dutch, some 50 titles in all, the contribution of Cameroon authors is considerable. Between 1960 and 2009, nine novels by five Cameroon writers were published in Dutch. This essay to analyses these translations using the methodology of Descriptive Translation Studies (Toury) and the sociology of translation (Heilbron and Sapiro Bilan). It examines how the Cameroon novels have been integrated into the Dutch literary system, what their position is, and most of all, to what extent the paratexts of the translated novels reflect this position. The detailed analysis of the reception of the Cameroon novels within the Dutch literary system reveals that there is a marked evolution in the way in which the publications have been selected and presented to the public. First, the classics of (post)colonial literature were translated, novels dealing with the (difficult) relations between the black colonised person and the white coloniser. At a later stage, the female perspective on contemporary challenges facing Africa becomes the sole focus of the novels in the corpus. What is less straightforward to define clearly, is the place of Dutch within the larger translation trends reflecting the international visibility of the novels. All the same, it seems safe to say that English, the most dominant global language, has not played a significant role in determining the translation history of any of the novels or authors under consideration. None of the novels in the corpus was first translated into English. In fact, the languages with a central position (Heilbron and Sapiro), German and Russian before 1989, appear to have been more influential. Three of the five authors were first published in a central language: Oyono and Beyala were translated into German, whereas Beti was translated into Russian. By contrast, two authors were first translated into a (semi-)peripheral language: Werewere into Dutch and Miano into Spanish. What appears to be important for the Dutch translations is that certain agents and promotors of translation played a crucial role in this. From that perspective, Magrit de Sablonière, who translated the first two African francophone novels, certainly merits special attention, as do two book collections devoted to europhone African literature, De Derde Spreker-Serie and Afrikaanse Bibliotheek, as well as the people behind them, Sjef Theunis and Jan Kees van der Werk. <![CDATA[<b>Huldeblyk.  Tienie du Plessis: maker van boeke</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100015&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt In the corpus of African francophone novels that have been translated into Dutch, some 50 titles in all, the contribution of Cameroon authors is considerable. Between 1960 and 2009, nine novels by five Cameroon writers were published in Dutch. This essay to analyses these translations using the methodology of Descriptive Translation Studies (Toury) and the sociology of translation (Heilbron and Sapiro Bilan). It examines how the Cameroon novels have been integrated into the Dutch literary system, what their position is, and most of all, to what extent the paratexts of the translated novels reflect this position. The detailed analysis of the reception of the Cameroon novels within the Dutch literary system reveals that there is a marked evolution in the way in which the publications have been selected and presented to the public. First, the classics of (post)colonial literature were translated, novels dealing with the (difficult) relations between the black colonised person and the white coloniser. At a later stage, the female perspective on contemporary challenges facing Africa becomes the sole focus of the novels in the corpus. What is less straightforward to define clearly, is the place of Dutch within the larger translation trends reflecting the international visibility of the novels. All the same, it seems safe to say that English, the most dominant global language, has not played a significant role in determining the translation history of any of the novels or authors under consideration. None of the novels in the corpus was first translated into English. In fact, the languages with a central position (Heilbron and Sapiro), German and Russian before 1989, appear to have been more influential. Three of the five authors were first published in a central language: Oyono and Beyala were translated into German, whereas Beti was translated into Russian. By contrast, two authors were first translated into a (semi-)peripheral language: Werewere into Dutch and Miano into Spanish. What appears to be important for the Dutch translations is that certain agents and promotors of translation played a crucial role in this. From that perspective, Magrit de Sablonière, who translated the first two African francophone novels, certainly merits special attention, as do two book collections devoted to europhone African literature, De Derde Spreker-Serie and Afrikaanse Bibliotheek, as well as the people behind them, Sjef Theunis and Jan Kees van der Werk. <![CDATA[<b>Discursive patterns in <i>Brandwaterkom </i>by Alexander Strachan</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100016&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The recently published and prizewinning novel Brandwaterkom is vintage Strachan with an intricate structure, imbedded stories and a whole network of allusions. Typical of postmodernist writing, the relationship between fact and fiction, historiography and the novel is problematized. The primary narrator is a Hermes-figure who constantly reflects upon the narrative in metafictional fashion, questioning and even belittling his own omniscience and omnipotence as narrator. The main story centres on Fanie Vilonel, a traitor during the Boer War, and the motif of treachery is central in the story, discourse and narration. <![CDATA[<b>Samsa-masjien</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100017&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The recently published and prizewinning novel Brandwaterkom is vintage Strachan with an intricate structure, imbedded stories and a whole network of allusions. Typical of postmodernist writing, the relationship between fact and fiction, historiography and the novel is problematized. The primary narrator is a Hermes-figure who constantly reflects upon the narrative in metafictional fashion, questioning and even belittling his own omniscience and omnipotence as narrator. The main story centres on Fanie Vilonel, a traitor during the Boer War, and the motif of treachery is central in the story, discourse and narration. <![CDATA[<b>Stukke teater</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100018&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The recently published and prizewinning novel Brandwaterkom is vintage Strachan with an intricate structure, imbedded stories and a whole network of allusions. Typical of postmodernist writing, the relationship between fact and fiction, historiography and the novel is problematized. The primary narrator is a Hermes-figure who constantly reflects upon the narrative in metafictional fashion, questioning and even belittling his own omniscience and omnipotence as narrator. The main story centres on Fanie Vilonel, a traitor during the Boer War, and the motif of treachery is central in the story, discourse and narration. <![CDATA[<b>Skadu oor die sonwyser</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100019&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The recently published and prizewinning novel Brandwaterkom is vintage Strachan with an intricate structure, imbedded stories and a whole network of allusions. Typical of postmodernist writing, the relationship between fact and fiction, historiography and the novel is problematized. The primary narrator is a Hermes-figure who constantly reflects upon the narrative in metafictional fashion, questioning and even belittling his own omniscience and omnipotence as narrator. The main story centres on Fanie Vilonel, a traitor during the Boer War, and the motif of treachery is central in the story, discourse and narration. <![CDATA[<b>Voor-bode</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100020&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The recently published and prizewinning novel Brandwaterkom is vintage Strachan with an intricate structure, imbedded stories and a whole network of allusions. Typical of postmodernist writing, the relationship between fact and fiction, historiography and the novel is problematized. The primary narrator is a Hermes-figure who constantly reflects upon the narrative in metafictional fashion, questioning and even belittling his own omniscience and omnipotence as narrator. The main story centres on Fanie Vilonel, a traitor during the Boer War, and the motif of treachery is central in the story, discourse and narration. <![CDATA[<b>Wonderboom</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100021&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The recently published and prizewinning novel Brandwaterkom is vintage Strachan with an intricate structure, imbedded stories and a whole network of allusions. Typical of postmodernist writing, the relationship between fact and fiction, historiography and the novel is problematized. The primary narrator is a Hermes-figure who constantly reflects upon the narrative in metafictional fashion, questioning and even belittling his own omniscience and omnipotence as narrator. The main story centres on Fanie Vilonel, a traitor during the Boer War, and the motif of treachery is central in the story, discourse and narration. <![CDATA[<b>Komplot</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100022&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The recently published and prizewinning novel Brandwaterkom is vintage Strachan with an intricate structure, imbedded stories and a whole network of allusions. Typical of postmodernist writing, the relationship between fact and fiction, historiography and the novel is problematized. The primary narrator is a Hermes-figure who constantly reflects upon the narrative in metafictional fashion, questioning and even belittling his own omniscience and omnipotence as narrator. The main story centres on Fanie Vilonel, a traitor during the Boer War, and the motif of treachery is central in the story, discourse and narration. <![CDATA[<b>Kamee</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100023&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The recently published and prizewinning novel Brandwaterkom is vintage Strachan with an intricate structure, imbedded stories and a whole network of allusions. Typical of postmodernist writing, the relationship between fact and fiction, historiography and the novel is problematized. The primary narrator is a Hermes-figure who constantly reflects upon the narrative in metafictional fashion, questioning and even belittling his own omniscience and omnipotence as narrator. The main story centres on Fanie Vilonel, a traitor during the Boer War, and the motif of treachery is central in the story, discourse and narration. <![CDATA[<b>Die potlooddief se bruid en ander stories</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100024&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The recently published and prizewinning novel Brandwaterkom is vintage Strachan with an intricate structure, imbedded stories and a whole network of allusions. Typical of postmodernist writing, the relationship between fact and fiction, historiography and the novel is problematized. The primary narrator is a Hermes-figure who constantly reflects upon the narrative in metafictional fashion, questioning and even belittling his own omniscience and omnipotence as narrator. The main story centres on Fanie Vilonel, a traitor during the Boer War, and the motif of treachery is central in the story, discourse and narration. <![CDATA[<b>Nuwe Stories 3</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100025&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The recently published and prizewinning novel Brandwaterkom is vintage Strachan with an intricate structure, imbedded stories and a whole network of allusions. Typical of postmodernist writing, the relationship between fact and fiction, historiography and the novel is problematized. The primary narrator is a Hermes-figure who constantly reflects upon the narrative in metafictional fashion, questioning and even belittling his own omniscience and omnipotence as narrator. The main story centres on Fanie Vilonel, a traitor during the Boer War, and the motif of treachery is central in the story, discourse and narration. <![CDATA[<b>Donker spoor</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100026&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The recently published and prizewinning novel Brandwaterkom is vintage Strachan with an intricate structure, imbedded stories and a whole network of allusions. Typical of postmodernist writing, the relationship between fact and fiction, historiography and the novel is problematized. The primary narrator is a Hermes-figure who constantly reflects upon the narrative in metafictional fashion, questioning and even belittling his own omniscience and omnipotence as narrator. The main story centres on Fanie Vilonel, a traitor during the Boer War, and the motif of treachery is central in the story, discourse and narration. <![CDATA[<b>Soos familie. Stedelike huiswerkers in Suid-Afrikaanse tekste</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100027&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The recently published and prizewinning novel Brandwaterkom is vintage Strachan with an intricate structure, imbedded stories and a whole network of allusions. Typical of postmodernist writing, the relationship between fact and fiction, historiography and the novel is problematized. The primary narrator is a Hermes-figure who constantly reflects upon the narrative in metafictional fashion, questioning and even belittling his own omniscience and omnipotence as narrator. The main story centres on Fanie Vilonel, a traitor during the Boer War, and the motif of treachery is central in the story, discourse and narration. <![CDATA[<b>Afrikaansmetodiek deur 'n nuwe bril</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100028&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The recently published and prizewinning novel Brandwaterkom is vintage Strachan with an intricate structure, imbedded stories and a whole network of allusions. Typical of postmodernist writing, the relationship between fact and fiction, historiography and the novel is problematized. The primary narrator is a Hermes-figure who constantly reflects upon the narrative in metafictional fashion, questioning and even belittling his own omniscience and omnipotence as narrator. The main story centres on Fanie Vilonel, a traitor during the Boer War, and the motif of treachery is central in the story, discourse and narration. <![CDATA[<b>Eugene de Kock: Sluipmoordenaar van die staat</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100029&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The recently published and prizewinning novel Brandwaterkom is vintage Strachan with an intricate structure, imbedded stories and a whole network of allusions. Typical of postmodernist writing, the relationship between fact and fiction, historiography and the novel is problematized. The primary narrator is a Hermes-figure who constantly reflects upon the narrative in metafictional fashion, questioning and even belittling his own omniscience and omnipotence as narrator. The main story centres on Fanie Vilonel, a traitor during the Boer War, and the motif of treachery is central in the story, discourse and narration. <![CDATA[<b>The Shadow of the Hummingbird</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100030&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The recently published and prizewinning novel Brandwaterkom is vintage Strachan with an intricate structure, imbedded stories and a whole network of allusions. Typical of postmodernist writing, the relationship between fact and fiction, historiography and the novel is problematized. The primary narrator is a Hermes-figure who constantly reflects upon the narrative in metafictional fashion, questioning and even belittling his own omniscience and omnipotence as narrator. The main story centres on Fanie Vilonel, a traitor during the Boer War, and the motif of treachery is central in the story, discourse and narration. <![CDATA[<b>Breyten Breytenbach, A Monologue in Two Voices</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0041-476X2016000100031&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The recently published and prizewinning novel Brandwaterkom is vintage Strachan with an intricate structure, imbedded stories and a whole network of allusions. Typical of postmodernist writing, the relationship between fact and fiction, historiography and the novel is problematized. The primary narrator is a Hermes-figure who constantly reflects upon the narrative in metafictional fashion, questioning and even belittling his own omniscience and omnipotence as narrator. The main story centres on Fanie Vilonel, a traitor during the Boer War, and the motif of treachery is central in the story, discourse and narration.