Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Dental Journal ]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=0011-851620210004&lang=pt vol. 76 num. 4 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>The importance of continuing professional development</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162021000400001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Dentist bringing malicious prosecution proceedings against patient</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162021000400002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>A preliminary inquiry on the association between pre-admission assessments and academic performance of first year dental technology students' within a South African university of technology</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162021000400003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: The use of selection, diagnostic, proficiency, placement, admission, manual dexterity and aptitude tests can reportedly predict students' academic success. Predictive admission procedures help to reduce dropout rates, improve academic performance, increase success rates, and selectively exclude applicants who are unlikely to be successful in the course. There is an absence of research, however, in this area of work in Dental Technology. AIM: To examine the association between pre-admission assessments and Dental Technology students' academic performance in a South African University of Technology. DESIGN: A quantitative and cross-sectional study design was used. METHODS: The target populations were the 2018 and 2019 first-year Dental Technology students. Retrospective data extracted from academic records and programme files were statistically analysed to measure the correlations against students' academic performance RESULTS: Despite there being no significant differences between pre-admission tests and students' academic performance, there were significant positive correlations between first-year university subjects. CONCLUSIONS: There are indications of horizontal coherence between the discipline-specific subjects in the first-year Dental Technology curriculum. Examining the association between pre-admission tests and students' academic results through to graduation, together with the horizontal and vertical alignments of all subjects in the undergraduate Dental Technology curriculum, can facilitate the learning pathways for students to succeed academically at universities. <![CDATA[<b>Audit of the workload in a maxillofacial and oral surgical unit in Johannesburg</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162021000400004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Maxillofacial and oral surgical (MFOS) audits are able to provide data to both current and prospective patients regarding the quality of care an institution is capable of providing. The more frequently performed MFOS procedures can be determined and the allocation of funding and resources can therefore be achieved more appropriately. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To conduct an audit to evaluate the workload and scope of practice of the MFOS unit of the Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital (CMJAH) for the year 2015 by quantifying MFOS conditions and the respective treatment modalities. DESIGN: The study was retrospective and cross-sectional. METHODS: Data was retrieved from the patient logbook of the unit which was then entered into a Microsoft Excel Spreadsheet. Pie graphs and bar charts representing the data were then generated. RESULTS: A total of 1 750 patients were treated in the unit. The male to female ratio was 1.3:1 and the majority of these patients were in their 3rd and 4th age decade. Most patients required a tooth extraction mainly for an impacted 3rd molar. CONCLUSIONS: Dentoalveolar surgery was the most commonly performed procedure followed by the treatment of facial fractures. Pathological and other MFOS conditions were less commonly encountered. The CMJAH MFOS unit treats a high volume of patients according to comparisons with global studies. <![CDATA[<b>The orthodontist's views regarding academic education in cleft lip and palate as well as craniofacial deformities in South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162021000400005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt BACKGROUND: Orthodontists are essential members of a craniofacial team (American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association Team Standards Committee).¹ Because cleft lip/palate (CLP) and craniofacial deformities (CFD) vary in severity and facial growth patterns, treatment is complex and lengthy and requires collaboration among different disciplines. Consequently, orthodontists need specialised training in this field to reach the treatment goals of good facial growth, aesthetically acceptable appearance, and dental occlusion. Therefore, it becomes increasingly important to provide adequate training for orthodontists, so they can not only provide efficient treatment but can also undertake a leadership role in the field OBJECTIVES: To obtain information regarding. • the CLP and CFD academic education of orthodontists the professional services that orthodontists offer to CLP and CFD patients. • the educational and training needs of orthodontists in this field. METHOD: A 54-item online survey to collect quantitative data was conducted by means of an interview, using a randomised sample of orthodontists attending the annual scientific conference of the South African Society of Orthodontics. RESULTS: The questionnaire was completed by 53 orthodontists, 54.6% of whom had more than 10 years of professional experience. Of the respondents, 84.8% experienced some clinical exposure in this field during their postgraduate education. Treatment for CLP and CFD patients was offered by 92% of the professionals, but only 21.7% had high confidence in their expertise in treating CLP/CFD patients. Of the respondents, 88% agreed there was a need to improve CLP and CFD education, and the majority recommended fellowship training and certified courses. The rest suggested continuing-education workshops. CONCLUSION: Most of the orthodontists provided treatment for both CLP and CFD patients despite some of them lacking confidence in treating such cases. The majority agreed that there is a strong need to establish an educational strategy to meet the needs of orthodontists who treat CLP and CFD patients. The respondents suggested that programmes such as fellowship training, degree couses, certified courses, and continuing education workshops could be used. <![CDATA[<b>Tooth loss in relation to serum cotinine levels - A cross-sectional study from the Belville South area in South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162021000400006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Tooth loss constitutes a major public health challenge, sharing common risk factors with non-communicable diseases. Aims and objectives: To report the relationship between tooth loss and serum cotinine levels in a population sample of mixed ethnic heritage from the Belville South area in South Africa. DESIGN: Cross-sectional epidemiological study. METHODS: Subjects were invited from 2014 to 2016 according to a consecutive sampling technique and all those who met the inclusion criteria were included. RESULTS: In all, 1876 individuals were included, being 1416 females (75.5%), with a combined average age of 49.5 ±15.3 years. In total 46.7% of the sample was edentulous, with females presenting a higher proportion than males (50.7% vs. 34.1%, p<0.001 The relative risk (RR) of being edentulous was higher for females (RR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.35-2.41, p<0.001) and for participants with cotinine levels 15-299 ng/ml (RR = 1.37, 95% CI=1.02 = 1.83, p=0.04) and &gt;300 ng/ml (RR = 1.51, 95% CI=1.09-2.08, p=0.01). Maxillary incisors and mandibular molars were the most prevalent missing teeth. CONCLUSIONS: The burden of tooth loss is high in the studied population sample, as well their unmet needs for dental care. Female gender, tobacco exposure, and aging were associated with partial and total edentulism. <![CDATA[<b>Compulsory community service for dentists - Opportunity for meaningful reform</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162021000400007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Previous studies indicate that the delivery of the compulsory community service (CS) programme was far from the intended objectives. It is plausible that the intended vision of the programme for the young graduates to "...develop skills, acquire knowledge, behaviour patterns and critical thinking that would help in their professional development and future careers." may not be realizable. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the extent to which CS programme enabled CS dentists to develop clinical skills. METHODS: A national cross-sectional study was undertaken on CS dentists. Adapted visual analogue scale (VAS) assessed the frequency of work performed and levels of skills or competency acquired. RESULTS: A total of 217/235 dentists participated, (response rate of 92.34%). The clinical work undertaken and skills/competence acquired were positively correlated; [Mean (SD) = 1.10 (0.326), 1.10 (0.359); r = 0.945, p = <0.000, n = 217] respectively. This finding validates the associated loss of skills and competence because of lack of clinical exposure during CS. Specialised dental procedures were never or rarely performed during CS (89.5%). Similarly the level of skills acquired during CS was minimal. CONCLUSION: CS in its present form disrupts continuing education and the development of learning and clinical skills. These cohorts of dentists have entered independent practice less prepared; may fail to provide quality care to the public. The CS programme is regressive, and requires urgent review and reform. <![CDATA[<b>Maxillofacial Radiology 190</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162021000400008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Previous studies indicate that the delivery of the compulsory community service (CS) programme was far from the intended objectives. It is plausible that the intended vision of the programme for the young graduates to "...develop skills, acquire knowledge, behaviour patterns and critical thinking that would help in their professional development and future careers." may not be realizable. OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the extent to which CS programme enabled CS dentists to develop clinical skills. METHODS: A national cross-sectional study was undertaken on CS dentists. Adapted visual analogue scale (VAS) assessed the frequency of work performed and levels of skills or competency acquired. RESULTS: A total of 217/235 dentists participated, (response rate of 92.34%). The clinical work undertaken and skills/competence acquired were positively correlated; [Mean (SD) = 1.10 (0.326), 1.10 (0.359); r = 0.945, p = <0.000, n = 217] respectively. This finding validates the associated loss of skills and competence because of lack of clinical exposure during CS. Specialised dental procedures were never or rarely performed during CS (89.5%). Similarly the level of skills acquired during CS was minimal. CONCLUSION: CS in its present form disrupts continuing education and the development of learning and clinical skills. These cohorts of dentists have entered independent practice less prepared; may fail to provide quality care to the public. The CS programme is regressive, and requires urgent review and reform. <![CDATA[<b>Is it better to be good or to do good?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162021000400009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt People have contemplated what it entails to be good and to do good. Philosophers propose that being good is an idea about yourself or others, while doing good is an action, towards yourself or others. Other theorists feel that those who want to 'be good' actually want to 'be seen as good', while those who strive to 'do good' are more concerned with following some calling or moral character. If we consider the dental situation, it raises the question of whether the motivation to do good should reign over the practical delivery of good dental treatment. This brings up many new considerations related to being good and doing good, and whether we are looking at good in terms of the practical performance of the clinical work or in terms of addressing the patient's best interests and welfare. This paper will explore some of the interesting dilemmas that clinicians may face in their daily practices. It aims to raise their awareness of the differences between patients' demands, actual needs, as well as their own philosophy towards treatment provision. <![CDATA[<b>What's new for the clinician? - Excerpts from and summaries of recently published papers</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162021000400010&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt People have contemplated what it entails to be good and to do good. Philosophers propose that being good is an idea about yourself or others, while doing good is an action, towards yourself or others. Other theorists feel that those who want to 'be good' actually want to 'be seen as good', while those who strive to 'do good' are more concerned with following some calling or moral character. If we consider the dental situation, it raises the question of whether the motivation to do good should reign over the practical delivery of good dental treatment. This brings up many new considerations related to being good and doing good, and whether we are looking at good in terms of the practical performance of the clinical work or in terms of addressing the patient's best interests and welfare. This paper will explore some of the interesting dilemmas that clinicians may face in their daily practices. It aims to raise their awareness of the differences between patients' demands, actual needs, as well as their own philosophy towards treatment provision.