Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Dental Journal ]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=0011-851620200010&lang=pt vol. 75 num. 10 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>The first black Africans to qualify in Dentistry in South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020001000001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>The changing face of Dentistry in the COVID-19 pandemic</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020001000002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>SADA communique to members - Licence and quality control tests for dental diagnostic X-ray imaging systems</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020001000003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>A base-line study of the wear of burs used for chairside milling of ceramic crowns of different hardness - Effect on internal fit and surface roughness</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020001000004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Wear of milling burs may affect the internal fit and surface roughness of the milled crown. AIM: To assess the wear of diamond and tungsten carbide (TC) burs from milling ceramic materials and the effect on internal fit and surface roughness. METHODS: Thirty crowns of each of the two materials were milled from the same standard preparation. Diamond burs were used for a feldspathic ceramic and TC burs for zirconia. Before and after the 10th, 20th and 30th milling, diamond particle loss was counted and cutting blade changes of the TC burs measured. Internal fit was measured using a silicone replica technique and surface roughness by 3D laser microscope. RESULTS: An average 26% loss of diamond particles occurred after 30 crowns, resulting in a 6% decrease in internal luting space and a 21% decrease in surface roughness. Wear of the TC burs resulted in a 13% decrease in the luting space, and a 16% increase in surface roughness. CONCLUSION: The wear of milling burs reduces the luting space, and the milling parameters must be adjusted to compensate for this. Surface roughness is affected by bur type: with diamond burs it decreased, and increased with TC burs. <![CDATA[<b>Epidemiological profile of patients utilizing dental public health services in the eThekwini and uMgungundlovu districts of KwaZulu-Natal province, South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020001000005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Oral conditions such as dental caries, periodontal diseases, tooth loss and trauma affect millions of people globally. These conditions can be prevented when detected early, thereby avoiding adverse outcomes. The prevalence of oral conditions has been reported in most provinces. However, there is a paucity of data in KwaZulu-Natal. AIM AND OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of oral conditions at public health facilities in two health districts in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional analytical study design was used to determine the nature of oral conditions treated in dental facilities in the eThekwini and uMgungundlovu districts, in KwaZulu-Natal. The study was conducted over a 5-month period (November 2018 - April 2019). After clinicians examined the patients they entered the data in the patients clinical records and selected information (routine medical history questions as well as 16 possible diagnosis codes) were entered into a data extraction template. The data were analyzed using statistical software SPSS. RESULTS: Dental caries was the most prevalent oral condition at 66.4% followed by periodontal disease at 11.7%, trauma at 7.3% and lastly tooth loss at 5.9% CONCLUSION: These findings contribute to knowledge on the prevalence of these oral conditions found in the province. <![CDATA[<b>Giant cell lichenoid stomatitis - An oral medicine case book</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020001000006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Oral conditions such as dental caries, periodontal diseases, tooth loss and trauma affect millions of people globally. These conditions can be prevented when detected early, thereby avoiding adverse outcomes. The prevalence of oral conditions has been reported in most provinces. However, there is a paucity of data in KwaZulu-Natal. AIM AND OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of oral conditions at public health facilities in two health districts in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional analytical study design was used to determine the nature of oral conditions treated in dental facilities in the eThekwini and uMgungundlovu districts, in KwaZulu-Natal. The study was conducted over a 5-month period (November 2018 - April 2019). After clinicians examined the patients they entered the data in the patients clinical records and selected information (routine medical history questions as well as 16 possible diagnosis codes) were entered into a data extraction template. The data were analyzed using statistical software SPSS. RESULTS: Dental caries was the most prevalent oral condition at 66.4% followed by periodontal disease at 11.7%, trauma at 7.3% and lastly tooth loss at 5.9% CONCLUSION: These findings contribute to knowledge on the prevalence of these oral conditions found in the province. <![CDATA[<b>Fracture of endodontic instruments - Part 1: Literature review on factors that influence instrument breakage</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020001000007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Oral conditions such as dental caries, periodontal diseases, tooth loss and trauma affect millions of people globally. These conditions can be prevented when detected early, thereby avoiding adverse outcomes. The prevalence of oral conditions has been reported in most provinces. However, there is a paucity of data in KwaZulu-Natal. AIM AND OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of oral conditions at public health facilities in two health districts in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional analytical study design was used to determine the nature of oral conditions treated in dental facilities in the eThekwini and uMgungundlovu districts, in KwaZulu-Natal. The study was conducted over a 5-month period (November 2018 - April 2019). After clinicians examined the patients they entered the data in the patients clinical records and selected information (routine medical history questions as well as 16 possible diagnosis codes) were entered into a data extraction template. The data were analyzed using statistical software SPSS. RESULTS: Dental caries was the most prevalent oral condition at 66.4% followed by periodontal disease at 11.7%, trauma at 7.3% and lastly tooth loss at 5.9% CONCLUSION: These findings contribute to knowledge on the prevalence of these oral conditions found in the province. <![CDATA[<b>Modern considerations when approaching fractured endodontic instruments - Part 2: A review of the literature and clinical techniques</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020001000008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Oral conditions such as dental caries, periodontal diseases, tooth loss and trauma affect millions of people globally. These conditions can be prevented when detected early, thereby avoiding adverse outcomes. The prevalence of oral conditions has been reported in most provinces. However, there is a paucity of data in KwaZulu-Natal. AIM AND OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the prevalence of oral conditions at public health facilities in two health districts in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional analytical study design was used to determine the nature of oral conditions treated in dental facilities in the eThekwini and uMgungundlovu districts, in KwaZulu-Natal. The study was conducted over a 5-month period (November 2018 - April 2019). After clinicians examined the patients they entered the data in the patients clinical records and selected information (routine medical history questions as well as 16 possible diagnosis codes) were entered into a data extraction template. The data were analyzed using statistical software SPSS. RESULTS: Dental caries was the most prevalent oral condition at 66.4% followed by periodontal disease at 11.7%, trauma at 7.3% and lastly tooth loss at 5.9% CONCLUSION: These findings contribute to knowledge on the prevalence of these oral conditions found in the province. <![CDATA[<b>Re-thinking South African dentists' role in a pandemic</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020001000009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Mass disasters such as terrorism, earthquakes and virus outbreaks challenge any healthcare system. Response teams to disasters typically consist of health professionals, local government, corporations, and community organizations, academics and the scientific community. Dentists or dental hygienists have traditionally only played a role in the identification of victims or in the treatment of facial trauma in disaster response. In South Africa, the response was mainly driven by medical professionals. Collaborative practice supported by inter-professional education may offer a solution to assist countries struggling with access to healthcare and overburdened health systems. In addition, revisiting the dentists' role in prioritising oral health and its relationship with general health and well-being is much needed. This short article provides a perspective on the role of South African dentists' contribution to health during a pandemic. <![CDATA[<b>What's new for the clinician? - Excerpts from and summaries of recently published papers</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020001000010&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Mass disasters such as terrorism, earthquakes and virus outbreaks challenge any healthcare system. Response teams to disasters typically consist of health professionals, local government, corporations, and community organizations, academics and the scientific community. Dentists or dental hygienists have traditionally only played a role in the identification of victims or in the treatment of facial trauma in disaster response. In South Africa, the response was mainly driven by medical professionals. Collaborative practice supported by inter-professional education may offer a solution to assist countries struggling with access to healthcare and overburdened health systems. In addition, revisiting the dentists' role in prioritising oral health and its relationship with general health and well-being is much needed. This short article provides a perspective on the role of South African dentists' contribution to health during a pandemic. <![CDATA[<b>Maxillofacial Radiology 186</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020001000011&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Mass disasters such as terrorism, earthquakes and virus outbreaks challenge any healthcare system. Response teams to disasters typically consist of health professionals, local government, corporations, and community organizations, academics and the scientific community. Dentists or dental hygienists have traditionally only played a role in the identification of victims or in the treatment of facial trauma in disaster response. In South Africa, the response was mainly driven by medical professionals. Collaborative practice supported by inter-professional education may offer a solution to assist countries struggling with access to healthcare and overburdened health systems. In addition, revisiting the dentists' role in prioritising oral health and its relationship with general health and well-being is much needed. This short article provides a perspective on the role of South African dentists' contribution to health during a pandemic. <![CDATA[<b>Dental images - Their use and abuse</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020001000012&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Mass disasters such as terrorism, earthquakes and virus outbreaks challenge any healthcare system. Response teams to disasters typically consist of health professionals, local government, corporations, and community organizations, academics and the scientific community. Dentists or dental hygienists have traditionally only played a role in the identification of victims or in the treatment of facial trauma in disaster response. In South Africa, the response was mainly driven by medical professionals. Collaborative practice supported by inter-professional education may offer a solution to assist countries struggling with access to healthcare and overburdened health systems. In addition, revisiting the dentists' role in prioritising oral health and its relationship with general health and well-being is much needed. This short article provides a perspective on the role of South African dentists' contribution to health during a pandemic.