Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Dental Journal ]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=0011-851620200007&lang=pt vol. 75 num. 7 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Edward Angle (1855 to 1930) ...the father of modern Orthodontics</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000700001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>We are allowed to change our minds</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000700002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>During the COVID-19 pandemic, oral health services including routine treatment may continue but must follow established international and South African protocol</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000700003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Oral health care for patients undergoing therapy for head and neck cancer in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa - A qualitative study</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000700004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt BACKGROUND: There is limited published evidence in KwaZulu-Natal on access to oral health care for patients undergoing cancer therapy in the head and neck region. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to assess patients' oral health-related perceptions, practices and needs during cancer therapy. METHODS: This was a descriptive case study. A semi-structured face-to-face interview was conducted with volunteers (n=12) undergoing cancer therapy in head and neck region. Purposive sampling was used to select study participants who were recruited from a public tertiary central referral hospital in KwaZulu-Natal. A semi-structured interview was also conducted with the eThekwini district coordinator for oral health services to gain better insight into oral health service delivery for patients with special needs. RESULTS: The results indicated that oral health care in the sample population was not prioritised. Some of the emergent themes included: participants' knowledge and oral health self-care practices, support for participants to cope with head and neck cancer, barriers in accessing facility-based oral health care (poor access to dental services, failure of the local clinic to provide appropriate care), lack of referral by oncology care practitioners for patients to access dental care, and existing gaps in oral health service delivery The reported non-existence of a specific oral health policy to address cancer and the absence of a risk factor intervention program highlighted some of the shortcomings for quality oral health service delivery in this population group. CONCLUSION: The results indicated that oral health care is important for patients undergoing cancer therapy. There is an urgent need for oral health planning in the province to take into account the specific oral health needs of this vulnerable population <![CDATA[<b>Development of a tool to measure patient expectations with complete removable dentures</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000700005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Patients' expectations of complete removable dentures may play a role in determining their level of satisfaction with newly constructed complete removable dentures. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To develop a Patient Expectation Questionnaire using a validated satisfaction questionnaire as framework and subsequently determine patients' expectations of complete removable dentures. OBJECTIVES: 1. To formulate a patient expectations questionnaire using a validated satisfaction questionnaire framework-that will assesses their perceptions of new dentures 2. To determine patient expectations related to masticatory functional, pain, psychological discomfort and social disability with complete removable dentures. METHODOLOGY: All the aspects of the newly formed Patient Expectation Questionnaire (PEQ) was formulated following the framework of the OHIP-20 patient satisfaction tool. The expectation questionnaire was administered to patients at their first dental visit with the information sheet and informed consent form. RESULTS: A series of statistical tests was done to assess the validity and reliability of the Patient Expectation Questionnaire. These tests concluded that the newly formulated questionnaire was reliable. CONCLUSION: Patient expectations can be determined prior to treatment thereby allowing the clinician to manage these expectations and strive to meet the attainable ones during the construction of the complete removable denture. Amongst others masticatory efficiency and pain were identified as being high on the request list for new complete removable dentures. <![CDATA[<b>The effect of A-dec ICX<sup>TM</sup> on microbiological water quality in self-contained dental units' water systems</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000700006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Patients' expectations of complete removable dentures may play a role in determining their level of satisfaction with newly constructed complete removable dentures. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To develop a Patient Expectation Questionnaire using a validated satisfaction questionnaire as framework and subsequently determine patients' expectations of complete removable dentures. OBJECTIVES: 1. To formulate a patient expectations questionnaire using a validated satisfaction questionnaire framework-that will assesses their perceptions of new dentures 2. To determine patient expectations related to masticatory functional, pain, psychological discomfort and social disability with complete removable dentures. METHODOLOGY: All the aspects of the newly formed Patient Expectation Questionnaire (PEQ) was formulated following the framework of the OHIP-20 patient satisfaction tool. The expectation questionnaire was administered to patients at their first dental visit with the information sheet and informed consent form. RESULTS: A series of statistical tests was done to assess the validity and reliability of the Patient Expectation Questionnaire. These tests concluded that the newly formulated questionnaire was reliable. CONCLUSION: Patient expectations can be determined prior to treatment thereby allowing the clinician to manage these expectations and strive to meet the attainable ones during the construction of the complete removable denture. Amongst others masticatory efficiency and pain were identified as being high on the request list for new complete removable dentures. <![CDATA[<b>The 'Digital Access Divide' at a South African Dental School- A cross-sectional study - Part 1</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000700007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This study sought to investigate the digital divide, from an access perspective, of dental students at the University of Pretoria. Second to final year students (n= 218 (87.2% response rate) completed a custom-designed survey at the end of 2017. The investigation enquired about the digital devices and infra-structure they owned and used for study purposes. They were also asked to reveal the networks and resources they used to access online platforms and to comment on any other related access issues such as the quality of the Internet, speed and reliability, as well as cost and personal implications related to usage. A clear divide could be detected for a minority of students (±1/7). Individually targeted interventions will be required to ensure an equitable and fair online learning experience. <![CDATA[<b>Dental students' self-perceived competency and usage of the internet for learning and evaluation purposes - Part 2</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000700008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Many dental lecturers are moving away from providing hand-out notes to their students and are rather opting for posting lecture material and tutorials on the internet using the various university platforms such as clickUP. At the same time a number of students have queried the need to purchase the prescribed text books due to their high costs, and dated content. The presumption is that all students have unrestricted and equal access to this material, and are competent using digital technology for learning and assessment, however there has been no formal investigation into whether this is so. Student access and usage was reported on in Part I of this study. The present paper investigated students' preferences with regards to the mode of learning material, and their self-perceived competencies in using the internet for various academic purposes. The project took the form of an anonymous, structured questionnaire that was given to all dental students from the second to the fifth year of study. Results revealed that over 90% of the students feel competent to access and use internet search engines for research and assignments, to connect with friends, and to download or watch videos. Slightly less (between 7090%) were confident using it for independent research, learning from lecture material, using e-dictionary, carrying out searches to learn extra material, completing short quizzes and assignments, or undertaking independent learning and reading. Almost all students needed to access the internet on a daily or weekly basis for work related issues, yet at least 40% reported to not being able to do so at times or in venues that suited their programs. Lecturers need to be aware of this to ensure these students are not disadvantaged in comparison to their peers if they do not submit requisite material on time. The university has pledged their commitment towards changing traditional teaching methods and embracing more blended learning platforms, as well as to helping students make up for the lost time due to the Corona virus pandemic. However, now more than ever they need to work together to ensure that all students have the necessary skills and technology needed to use the online platforms, and to provide the necessary tuition and changes if they wish to be truly committed to the well-being and education of their students. <![CDATA[<b>Dental enamel</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000700009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Dental enamel is the sparsest but most enduring component of all the tissues in the human body, yet co-ntrarily contains the most detailed historiography of its development. Accordingly, analysis of enamels' chemistry, histology and pathology can reveal detailed ambient information of both fossilized, long-deceased and its contemporary milieu occurring during amelogenesis. In this respect, dental enamel is the most versatile exponent of its developmental mechanisms and acquisition of its complex form. Dental enamel is the ultimate lexicographer of lives lived. <![CDATA[<b>A giant submandibular sialolith - How to manage?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000700010&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The presence of a sialolith is one of the most common diseases of salivary gland. It is relatively common in submandibular salivary glands and its duct. This case report is of a patient who presented at our unit with a history of severe pain and swelling on floor of the mouth, which was clinically and radiographically diagnosed as a sialolith. The diagnostic and treatment protocol in managing a patient with a giant sialolith is enumerated in this manuscript. <![CDATA[<b>What's new for the clinician? - Excerpts from and summaries of recently published papers</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000700011&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The presence of a sialolith is one of the most common diseases of salivary gland. It is relatively common in submandibular salivary glands and its duct. This case report is of a patient who presented at our unit with a history of severe pain and swelling on floor of the mouth, which was clinically and radiographically diagnosed as a sialolith. The diagnostic and treatment protocol in managing a patient with a giant sialolith is enumerated in this manuscript. <![CDATA[<b>Maxillofacial Radiology 183</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000700012&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The presence of a sialolith is one of the most common diseases of salivary gland. It is relatively common in submandibular salivary glands and its duct. This case report is of a patient who presented at our unit with a history of severe pain and swelling on floor of the mouth, which was clinically and radiographically diagnosed as a sialolith. The diagnostic and treatment protocol in managing a patient with a giant sialolith is enumerated in this manuscript. <![CDATA[<b>COVID-19 in dentistry- Ethical considerations</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000700013&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The presence of a sialolith is one of the most common diseases of salivary gland. It is relatively common in submandibular salivary glands and its duct. This case report is of a patient who presented at our unit with a history of severe pain and swelling on floor of the mouth, which was clinically and radiographically diagnosed as a sialolith. The diagnostic and treatment protocol in managing a patient with a giant sialolith is enumerated in this manuscript.