Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Dental Journal ]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=0011-851620200001&lang=pt vol. 75 num. 1 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Editor's notes</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000100001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Managing mental health wellness</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000100002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Appointment of Managing Editor</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000100003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Dr Ingrid Masello Ntombenhle Mokhine</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000100004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Self-reported oral hygiene practices and oral health status among dental professionals</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000100005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to evaluate the oral hygiene practices and oral status of dental professionals working in Riyadh, KSA. METHODS: Questionnaires were distributed to a conveniently se-ected sample of 400 dental professionals. The questionnaire included the demographics, oral-hygiene practices, past-dental history, self-reported current-dental status, dental appointments, self-reported family-dental condition, self-grading of oral-health and possible reasons for negligence in oral health. RESULTS: The response rate was 68.8%. Significant differences between male and female participants were observed regarding the reported frequencies of brushing (p=.001) and the history of dental visits (p = .013). Differences between the responses to the social habits on the consumption of coffee, tea, soft drinks, cigarettes and water pipe were insignificant. Generally, the participant's experiences with dental treatment was excellent to very good. Avoiding dental visits due to a fear of cross infection was very high (Likert scale = 3.47 out of 4) among participants. CONCLUSIONS: Participating dental professionals, oral hygiene practices and oral health status were satisfactory. Gender-based differences were found with females expressing more care regarding their oral health. Gingival bleeding/gingivitis and bruxism were prevalent among the male and female participants respectively. Poor oral hygiene was the primary cause for the damaged dentition. Fear of cross infection from the dental treatment prevented the participants for seeking dental treatment. <![CDATA[<b>Dental biomaterials: challenges in the translation from lab to patient</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000100006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Biomaterials are essential components of modern medicine. Dental biomaterials include any material or device used within the oral cavity for the diagnosis and treatment of oral conditions, diseases, and disorders. Whilst the literature remains abuzz with innovative and diverse technologies, an apparent disconnect is evident in the follow-through, affecting the impact on current clinical treatment regimens. This review will explore the product development process from concept to clinical application, in conjunction with the commercial aspects that affect clinical translation. Though serving the purpose of a roadmap for novice inventors, the primary intention of the paper is to focus on some of the challenges cited in the literature and to highlight factors that delay or, in due course, actually prevent clinical translation of even the grandest inventions. Clinicians should also be alert to the complexities affecting the arrival in their surgeries of new products and technologies, The ultimate aim is to assist in the decision-making of researchers when they may be initiating novel advances in oral-related therapies, by ensuring they are cognisant of past errors and limitations, whilst at the same time recognizing present hurdles. <![CDATA[<b>Cross-cultural adaptation of the Paediatric Oral Health-Related Quality of Life (POQL) tool in South Africa - a pilot project</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000100007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To translate and adapt a paediatric oral health-related quality of life (POQL) questionnaire into the South African languages of Sepedi, IsiZulu and Afrikaans. METHODS: The POQL-version: Parent-Report-on-child was translated twice into local languages. Translated-versions were revised and back translated into English by the different language-experts. A pre-final draft South African-version of POQL was tested on parents at the Pretoria Oral & Dental Hospital (n = 94). Impact-scores were calculated, chi-squared and t-tests were used to determine construct validity. Principal component analysis was used to determine structural validity. RESULTS: Responses were recorded in a 5-Likert-type scaling but could not be replicated in the manner of the original-tool. Seventy percent of responding parents were female and 53% were employed with significant differences between male (62%) and female (38%), (p<0.05). The male-parents were significantly older (40-yrs. vs. 35-yrs.; p<0.05). Most (61%) children had consulted the hospital for 'nonemergency' care. Internal consistency in the pre-final version was good with a Cronbach α-score of 0.91. Component analysis of the pre-final SA-tool, produced multiple different dimensions when compared with the 4-dimensions of the original tool in the American setting. CONCLUSIONS: The piloted pre-final SA version displayed good internal consistency yet had weaknesses with content, structural and construct validity. <![CDATA[<b>The use of cone beam computed tomography in establishing the etiology of an impacted tooth</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000100008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), a three-dimensional imaging modality, is considered a groundbreaking advance in the field of dental imaging. This case report illustrates how the use of CBCT enabled the correct diagnosis of the cause of the impaction of a central incisor in an orthodontic patient. A 10-year-old male patient presented with the chief complaint of a clinically missing permanent upper right central incisor. After clinical examination and history taking, diagnostic radiographs such as orthopantomo-graphs, lateral cephalograms and periapical radiographs were taken. On examination, the panoramic radiograph and lateral cephalogram demonstrated that the central incisor was impacted. The clinical signs, symptoms, and radiographic features indicated that an odontoma was causing the impaction. However, the presentation on the periapical radiographic presentation was suggestive of gemination, a developmental anomaly. A CBCT scan was requested to confirm whether there were two structures (odontoma and impacted central) or one single structure (gemination). The CBCT scans helped in determining the correct etiology for the clinically missing central incisor and aided the clinician to arrive at the definitive diagnosis that a supernumerary tooth was responsible for the impaction. The scan also helped in identifying the optimal path for surgical removal of the supernumerary tooth. <![CDATA[<b>What's new for the clinician? - excerpts from and summaries of recently published papers</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000100009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), a three-dimensional imaging modality, is considered a groundbreaking advance in the field of dental imaging. This case report illustrates how the use of CBCT enabled the correct diagnosis of the cause of the impaction of a central incisor in an orthodontic patient. A 10-year-old male patient presented with the chief complaint of a clinically missing permanent upper right central incisor. After clinical examination and history taking, diagnostic radiographs such as orthopantomo-graphs, lateral cephalograms and periapical radiographs were taken. On examination, the panoramic radiograph and lateral cephalogram demonstrated that the central incisor was impacted. The clinical signs, symptoms, and radiographic features indicated that an odontoma was causing the impaction. However, the presentation on the periapical radiographic presentation was suggestive of gemination, a developmental anomaly. A CBCT scan was requested to confirm whether there were two structures (odontoma and impacted central) or one single structure (gemination). The CBCT scans helped in determining the correct etiology for the clinically missing central incisor and aided the clinician to arrive at the definitive diagnosis that a supernumerary tooth was responsible for the impaction. The scan also helped in identifying the optimal path for surgical removal of the supernumerary tooth. <![CDATA[<b>Maxillofacial Radiology 177</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000100010&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), a three-dimensional imaging modality, is considered a groundbreaking advance in the field of dental imaging. This case report illustrates how the use of CBCT enabled the correct diagnosis of the cause of the impaction of a central incisor in an orthodontic patient. A 10-year-old male patient presented with the chief complaint of a clinically missing permanent upper right central incisor. After clinical examination and history taking, diagnostic radiographs such as orthopantomo-graphs, lateral cephalograms and periapical radiographs were taken. On examination, the panoramic radiograph and lateral cephalogram demonstrated that the central incisor was impacted. The clinical signs, symptoms, and radiographic features indicated that an odontoma was causing the impaction. However, the presentation on the periapical radiographic presentation was suggestive of gemination, a developmental anomaly. A CBCT scan was requested to confirm whether there were two structures (odontoma and impacted central) or one single structure (gemination). The CBCT scans helped in determining the correct etiology for the clinically missing central incisor and aided the clinician to arrive at the definitive diagnosis that a supernumerary tooth was responsible for the impaction. The scan also helped in identifying the optimal path for surgical removal of the supernumerary tooth. <![CDATA[<b>Constructing the consultation chair - balancing the four (E)-legs</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000100011&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), a three-dimensional imaging modality, is considered a groundbreaking advance in the field of dental imaging. This case report illustrates how the use of CBCT enabled the correct diagnosis of the cause of the impaction of a central incisor in an orthodontic patient. A 10-year-old male patient presented with the chief complaint of a clinically missing permanent upper right central incisor. After clinical examination and history taking, diagnostic radiographs such as orthopantomo-graphs, lateral cephalograms and periapical radiographs were taken. On examination, the panoramic radiograph and lateral cephalogram demonstrated that the central incisor was impacted. The clinical signs, symptoms, and radiographic features indicated that an odontoma was causing the impaction. However, the presentation on the periapical radiographic presentation was suggestive of gemination, a developmental anomaly. A CBCT scan was requested to confirm whether there were two structures (odontoma and impacted central) or one single structure (gemination). The CBCT scans helped in determining the correct etiology for the clinically missing central incisor and aided the clinician to arrive at the definitive diagnosis that a supernumerary tooth was responsible for the impaction. The scan also helped in identifying the optimal path for surgical removal of the supernumerary tooth. <![CDATA[<b>Pierre Fauchard the father of modern Dentistry (1678 - 1761)</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162020000100012&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), a three-dimensional imaging modality, is considered a groundbreaking advance in the field of dental imaging. This case report illustrates how the use of CBCT enabled the correct diagnosis of the cause of the impaction of a central incisor in an orthodontic patient. A 10-year-old male patient presented with the chief complaint of a clinically missing permanent upper right central incisor. After clinical examination and history taking, diagnostic radiographs such as orthopantomo-graphs, lateral cephalograms and periapical radiographs were taken. On examination, the panoramic radiograph and lateral cephalogram demonstrated that the central incisor was impacted. The clinical signs, symptoms, and radiographic features indicated that an odontoma was causing the impaction. However, the presentation on the periapical radiographic presentation was suggestive of gemination, a developmental anomaly. A CBCT scan was requested to confirm whether there were two structures (odontoma and impacted central) or one single structure (gemination). The CBCT scans helped in determining the correct etiology for the clinically missing central incisor and aided the clinician to arrive at the definitive diagnosis that a supernumerary tooth was responsible for the impaction. The scan also helped in identifying the optimal path for surgical removal of the supernumerary tooth.