Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Dental Journal ]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=0011-851620190009&lang=pt vol. 74 num. 9 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Opportunity beckons</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162019000900001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>The South African Dental Association responds to "getting your teeth straightened at a shopping mall" - the dental profession has a warning</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162019000900002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Relationship between cranial base flexure and sagittal jaw relationships</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162019000900003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Flexure of the cranial base plays a crucial role in the study of the craniofacial complex. The outcome of orthodontic treatment can be predicted if growth and flexure of the cranial base is understood. AIM: The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between cranial base flexure and sagittal jaw relationships in a sample of Black South African subjects. METHODOLOGY: A sample of pre-treatment lateral cephalograms of 300 patients with a mean age of 17.72 years was divided into three equal groups according to gender and skeletal classification. Age differences were tested using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Cranial base flexure differences were first tested using ANOVA and further evaluated using Student's f-test. RESULTS: Age distribution was similar in all three in all classes of sagittal jaw relationship. Class II subjects demonstrated a significantly larger cranial base flexure when compared with Class I and Class III subjects respectively. CONCLUSION: In this study sample, a larger cranial base flexure is a feature of Class II sagittal jaw relationship whilst both Class I and Class III sagittal jaw relationships are associated with smaller cranial base flexures. There were no significant differences between the Class I and Class III sagittal jaw relationship samples. <![CDATA[<b>The evolution of sialendoscopy in clinical practice</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162019000900004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Sialendoscopy is a relatively new technique first described by Katz et al. in 1991.¹ The technique of sialendoscopy entails using semirigid endoscopes to cannulate and view the interior of salivary ducts and to manage obstructions within these ducts. This technique provides a minimally invasive alternative to the traditional very invasive techniques of salivary gland excision. It can be used as a diagnostic instrument and as a therapeutic intervention for various causes of salivary duct obstruction. The objective of this research report was to assess the outcomes of sialendoscopy, performed over a 10-year period from 2008 and 2018 in a private practice setting in South Africa. The outcomes of sialendoscopy as a therapeutic intervention were compared for different aetiologies of salivary duct obstruction. A therapeutic sialendoscopy was deemed successful if after the obstruction was treated, the patient remained asymptomatic at follow up and if no complications ensued during sialendoscopy. The success rate in this study was 73.3%. The cases that were considered failures were due to excessive bleeding, abscess formation and failure of calculus retrieval. Despite our small sample size, it appears that sialendoscopy offers good outcomes for both the diagnosis and the treatment of the majority of cases of salivary ductal obstruction and that it is the gold standard for the first line management of this pathology. <![CDATA[<b>Minimally invasive management of a labial talon cusp: Clinical review and case report</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162019000900005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This case report presents the management of a rare occurrence of a labial talon cusp on a permanent maxillary lateral incisor. The buccal projection was reduced with a minimally invasive approach, with the aim of avoiding pulpal exposure during tooth preparation and thereby maintaining the vitality of the pulp. A direct resin veneer was placed to mask the remaining projection and to address the aesthetic concerns of the patient. <![CDATA[<b>Forensic dental identification of a burnt murder victim</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162019000900006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This case report presents the management of a rare occurrence of a labial talon cusp on a permanent maxillary lateral incisor. The buccal projection was reduced with a minimally invasive approach, with the aim of avoiding pulpal exposure during tooth preparation and thereby maintaining the vitality of the pulp. A direct resin veneer was placed to mask the remaining projection and to address the aesthetic concerns of the patient. <![CDATA[<b>Laser therapy as an adjunctive therapy for denture stomatitis</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162019000900007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt AIM: To provide updated information about the use of lasers as an adjunctive therapy for denture stomatitis, the most prevalent oral lesion amongst denture-wearing patients. Patients present with pain and burning sensation in the mouth, erythema, inflammation with swelling of the palatal mucosa. Normal function is disturbed, with difficulty in wearing the dentures and in eating and drinking. Ultimately the digestive system will be affected. Prolonged conventional treatment may lead to the development of resistant Candida albicans. The search for an alternative treatment modality has led to some studies which consider laser therapy as an option in the management of denture stomatitis. METHOD: A literature search using "PUBMED" and "Google" was undertaken, using these key words in combination: "laser therapy for denture stomatitis", "approaches", "strategies" Only those articles that dealt with denture stomatitis symptoms, treatment and laser therapy, were selected. Abstracts and full text articles were used to compile this short review. CONCLUSION: The literature indicates that laser therapy may reduce the risk of the development of a drug resistant Candida albicans and could improve the prospects of treatment success for denture stomatitis, However, there remains a need for more research studies on various clinical lasers and wider laser parameters. <![CDATA[<b>Glandular odontogenic cyst: case series and summary of the literature</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162019000900008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) remains a rare entity. It was initially named "sialo-odontogenic cyst" by Padayachee and Van Wyk in 1987 when they reported the first two cases. Thereafter the term glandular odontogenic cyst was suggested by Gardner et al. in 1988 and was subsequently adopted by the WHO.¹ In addition to its rarity, it has non-pathognomonic clinical and radiological features and hence can mimic other lesions. Since its recognition as an entity by the WHO in 1992, only two further cases of glandular odontogenic cyst have been seen at the authors' institution and are hereby reported together with a summary of the review articles in the English literature. <![CDATA[<b>Maxillofacial Radiology 175</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162019000900009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) remains a rare entity. It was initially named "sialo-odontogenic cyst" by Padayachee and Van Wyk in 1987 when they reported the first two cases. Thereafter the term glandular odontogenic cyst was suggested by Gardner et al. in 1988 and was subsequently adopted by the WHO.¹ In addition to its rarity, it has non-pathognomonic clinical and radiological features and hence can mimic other lesions. Since its recognition as an entity by the WHO in 1992, only two further cases of glandular odontogenic cyst have been seen at the authors' institution and are hereby reported together with a summary of the review articles in the English literature. <![CDATA[<b>What's new for the clinician: excerpts from and summaries of recently published papers</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162019000900010&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) remains a rare entity. It was initially named "sialo-odontogenic cyst" by Padayachee and Van Wyk in 1987 when they reported the first two cases. Thereafter the term glandular odontogenic cyst was suggested by Gardner et al. in 1988 and was subsequently adopted by the WHO.¹ In addition to its rarity, it has non-pathognomonic clinical and radiological features and hence can mimic other lesions. Since its recognition as an entity by the WHO in 1992, only two further cases of glandular odontogenic cyst have been seen at the authors' institution and are hereby reported together with a summary of the review articles in the English literature. <![CDATA[<b>Delve into Research Ethics</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162019000900011&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The glandular odontogenic cyst (GOC) remains a rare entity. It was initially named "sialo-odontogenic cyst" by Padayachee and Van Wyk in 1987 when they reported the first two cases. Thereafter the term glandular odontogenic cyst was suggested by Gardner et al. in 1988 and was subsequently adopted by the WHO.¹ In addition to its rarity, it has non-pathognomonic clinical and radiological features and hence can mimic other lesions. Since its recognition as an entity by the WHO in 1992, only two further cases of glandular odontogenic cyst have been seen at the authors' institution and are hereby reported together with a summary of the review articles in the English literature.