Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Dental Journal ]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=0011-851620170010&lang=pt vol. 72 num. 10 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Avoid the voids... or minute the minutiae?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017001000001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>SADA Dental & Oral Health Congress & Exhibition 2018</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017001000002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>The prevalence of occupational health-related conditions among oral health practitioners in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017001000003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Oral health practitioners may be affected by occupational health-related conditions associated with their work environment. There is a lack of relevant data on the prevalence of these conditions among dentists, dental therapists and oral hygienists in KwaZulu-Natal. AIM: To describe the burden of occupational health-related conditions among oral health practitioners in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa. METHODS: This cross sectional study evaluated data obtained through a self-administered questionnaire that sought information on demographics, occupational health, psychosocial risk factors, work tasks and planning. Data was exported from QuestionPro and analysed in SPSS version 24. Frequencies and means with standard deviations were calculated for categorical and continuous variables respectively RESULTS: Oral hygienists most frequently reported symptoms of musculoskeletal disorders affecting the neck (70%) and the hand (56.5%). Dentists reported the highest prevalence of shoulder pain (55.8%) and of percutaneous injuries (42,3%). The dentists, dental therapists and oral hygienists also reported latex allergy (10.4%) and percutaneous injuries (32.6%) CONCLUSION: The prevalence of occupational health-related conditions reported by the oral health care workers indicate the need to raise awareness about occupational health and warrants the inclusion of these issues on education programs and dental curricula to ensure a healthy work environment. <![CDATA[<b>Accuracy of acetate overlays in bite mark comparison: How accurate is an ideal bite pattern?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017001000004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Forensically, a bite mark on human skin is reliant on the matching of the alignment and position of the dentition of the perpetrator with the bruise pattern inflicted by the bite. If there is more than one suspect, the bite pattern of each suspect needs to be analysed. At least hypothetically, a bite delivered by a person who has had orthodontic treatment will result in a bruise pattern of an ideal arrangement of the teeth. If there are two suspects, both of whom have had orthodontic treatment, could that "ideal" alignment compromise identification of the perpetrator of the bite mark? AIM: To determine the accuracy of an ideal bite pattern and whether an exact match could be obtained when comparing acetate overlays with bite patterns registered in wax of treated orthodontic cases. METHOD: The biting patterns of upper and lower teeth of each of the study models were recorded in grey bite registration wax (Alminax®). Two examiners viewed the bite mark patterns and correlated them with the study models. RESULT: In some cases an exact match between the teeth of the plaster model and the bite mark was not possible. <![CDATA[<b>A pilot study investigating the presence of voids in bulk fill flowable composites</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017001000005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt OBJECTIVE: To investigate the presence of voids in bulk fill flowable composites. METHODS: This study investigated two well-known bulk-fill flowable composites, Smart Dentin Replacement (SDR) (Dentsply/Caulk, Milford, Germany) and Filtek bulk fill flowable (FBF) (3M ESPE, Minnesota, USA). Three ampules of each material were randomly selected. The ampules were subjected to 3D Micro-CT (General Electric Phoenix V|Tome|X L240) reconstruction in order to assess the presence of any voids within the ampules. RESULTS: Voids were present in all the ampules. The total void percentage for each group of three ampules was found to be SDR : 1.147 % and FBF : 0.0424 %. There was a significant difference between the volume of voids for SDR and FBF, p-value=0.003924. CONCLUSION: Voids were found in the randomly selected samples of bulk-fill flowable composites. This is undesirable and manufacturers should be urged to ensure that no voids are present, or at least are minimized in the ampules of material. <![CDATA[<b>Fragmentary tooth root development: biological and forensic dental implications</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017001000006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Recent findings indicate that there could be continued root development after the successful surgical removal of an impacted tooth. The paper provides a brief review of normal root development, emphasizing the chain of reciprocal epithelial-ectomesenchymal interactions which regulate all aspects of this process. Mineralized dental structures are not an absolute requirement for tooth root development, but residual fragments of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS), together with the associated ectomesenchymal cells, will enable continued growth. The findings presented in this paper have significant implications in forensic odontology, dental litigation and for routine and elective tooth extractions. <![CDATA[<b>Part 15. Secondary use of unethically obtained data: Fifty shades of grey/ aye/nay</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017001000007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Recent findings indicate that there could be continued root development after the successful surgical removal of an impacted tooth. The paper provides a brief review of normal root development, emphasizing the chain of reciprocal epithelial-ectomesenchymal interactions which regulate all aspects of this process. Mineralized dental structures are not an absolute requirement for tooth root development, but residual fragments of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS), together with the associated ectomesenchymal cells, will enable continued growth. The findings presented in this paper have significant implications in forensic odontology, dental litigation and for routine and elective tooth extractions. <![CDATA[<b>Maxillo-facial radiology case 156</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017001000008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Recent findings indicate that there could be continued root development after the successful surgical removal of an impacted tooth. The paper provides a brief review of normal root development, emphasizing the chain of reciprocal epithelial-ectomesenchymal interactions which regulate all aspects of this process. Mineralized dental structures are not an absolute requirement for tooth root development, but residual fragments of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS), together with the associated ectomesenchymal cells, will enable continued growth. The findings presented in this paper have significant implications in forensic odontology, dental litigation and for routine and elective tooth extractions. <![CDATA[<b>What's new for the clinician? Summaries of and excerpts from recently published papers</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017001000009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Recent findings indicate that there could be continued root development after the successful surgical removal of an impacted tooth. The paper provides a brief review of normal root development, emphasizing the chain of reciprocal epithelial-ectomesenchymal interactions which regulate all aspects of this process. Mineralized dental structures are not an absolute requirement for tooth root development, but residual fragments of Hertwig's epithelial root sheath (HERS), together with the associated ectomesenchymal cells, will enable continued growth. The findings presented in this paper have significant implications in forensic odontology, dental litigation and for routine and elective tooth extractions.