Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Dental Journal ]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=0011-851620170009&lang=pt vol. 72 num. 9 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Be Aware of Profusion!</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000900001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Letter to the Editor</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000900002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Oral health amongst male inmates in Saudi prisons compared with that of a sample of the general male population</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000900003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt OBJECTIVES: A survey compared dental caries experience, perceived problems, treatment needs and exposure to risk factors in a group of prisoners in two Saudi prisons with those of a group from the general population. METHODS: The study included male prisoners ( n =82) in Dammam and Khobar prisons (October 2014- January 2015) An age, gender and education-matched control group ( n=79) was selected from literacy schools and an elderly care home using a stratified sampling method. Data was collected on an interview questionnaire. Caries experience was assessed using World Health Organization criteria. RESULTS: Of the prisoners, 75.6%, and, of the subjects in the control group, 47.4%, reported smoking cigarettes daily, 95.1% and 70.9% reported having oral health problems such as dental pain or bleeding on brushing whilst 97.6% and 70.9% reported treatment need, with caries incidence being around 90.2% and 57%. Being a prisoner increased the odds of having dental problems affecting daily activities (odds ratio= 7.37), and having decayed teeth (odds ratio= 6.99).CONCLUSIONS: Male inmates in the two Saudi prisons had higher odds of dental problems than did subjects from the general population. Governmental action and volunteering initiatives are needed to reduce oral health inequalities between prisoners and the general population. <![CDATA[<b>A morphological study of the lingula in South Africans in relation to sagittal split osteotomy</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000900004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt PURPOSE: To establish the position and shape of the lingula of the mandible in relation to the surrounding anatomical landmarks, data requisite for inferior alveolar nerve blocks and mandibular osteotomies.METHODS: Measurements were carried out on 201 sides from 113 adult dry mandibles.RESULTS: The most common shape of the lingula was truncated, found in 38.8% of cases, followed by the triangular (30.8 %), nodular (21.4%) and assimilated (8.9%) types. The average distances of the tip of the lingula from the anterior border, posterior border and sigmoid notch of the ramus of the mandible were 20.15mm, 16.77mm and 16.3mm respectively, and, from the mandibular second molar tooth, 33.3mm. The lingula was above the level of the occlusal plane in 63.7% of cases, by an average of 6.5mm.CONCLUSION: The position of the lingula has been shown to be related to adjacent anatomical landmarks which may provide useful clinical references. in Lingula is above the level of the occlusal plane by an average distance of 6.5 mm. Truncated type is the most common shape of the lingula A higher position of the lingula may be anticipated in both Class II and III malocclusions. <![CDATA[<b>Apexification of immature teeth using an apical matrix and MTA barrier material: Report of two cases</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000900005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Apexification is defined as a method to induce a calcified barrier at the root tip of a tooth with an open apex or to encourage the continued apical development of an incomplete root in teeth with necrotic pulps. Two case reports are presented in which teeth with large open apices and immature roots were clinically managed by placing demineralised freeze-dried bone allograft (DFDBA) as a matrix before placement of Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) as an apical barrier. The indications for and advantages of using DFDBA and MTA are discussed. <![CDATA[<b>Nasal Rhinosporidiosis in South Africa: Review of literature and report of a case</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000900006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt BACKGROUND: Rhinosporidiosis is a rare chronic granulomatous infection presenting primarily on the mucous membrane of nasal cavities, nasopharynx and oral cavity. Rhinosporidium seeberi has been identified as the causative agent; however recent studies have implicated a waterborne organism, the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa, as the cause. It is endemic in India and Sri Lanka where 90% of all infections occur. The aim of this paper is to review literature on rhinosporidiosis and to report on one of the sporadic cases encountered in South Africa, Gauteng province.CASE PRESENTATION: A 17 year old black male patient presented with a pedunculated nasal mass causing nasal obstruction. Microscopical examination showed a polypoid mass with numerous thick walled sporangia in a background of fibrovascular connective tissue stroma with granulomatous inflammation. Fluorescent microscopy was effective in identifying the walls of the sporangia in the granulomas. A final diagnosis of nasal rhinosporidiosis was made.CONCLUSION: Rhinosporidiosis, a rare condition in our environment, has the potential to disseminate to other parts of the body. It is therefore critical for the clinicians to always consider rhinosporidiosis as a differential diagnosis when assessing patients presenting with nasal polyps. <![CDATA[<b>Dental implications of bisphosphonate therapy in osteogenesis imperfecta</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000900007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Bisphosphonate therapy, which is effective in reducing the rate of fracturing, represents a significant advance in the medical management of Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). When administered to affected persons, bisphosphonate therapy is relevant in their dental and craniofacial management. A particular concern is bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaws, a rare but potentially devastating problem. Osteogenesis imperfecta type III (OI III) is relatively common amongst the indigenous Black African population of South Africa. With the co-operation of medical colleagues 64 Black South African individuals with OI III, between the ages of three months and 18 years, were identified and were dentally assessed. Fifty-five of these individuals had received or were receiving bisphosphonate therapy. This impacted on dental treatment planning and delivery since there is arisk of the complication of bisphosphonate induced osteonecrosis of the jaws. There is a paucity of information regarding the dental management of persons with OI who are receiving bisphosphonate therapy. In particular, orthodontists and maxillofacial surgeons have expressed concern regarding the advisability of orthodontic extractions, tooth movement when faced with the potential for developing osteonecrosis of the jaws. In view of these uncertainties, the dental implications of bisphosphonate therapy have been reviewed and discussed in this article. <![CDATA[<b>Maxillo-facial radiology case 155</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000900008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Bisphosphonate therapy, which is effective in reducing the rate of fracturing, represents a significant advance in the medical management of Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). When administered to affected persons, bisphosphonate therapy is relevant in their dental and craniofacial management. A particular concern is bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaws, a rare but potentially devastating problem. Osteogenesis imperfecta type III (OI III) is relatively common amongst the indigenous Black African population of South Africa. With the co-operation of medical colleagues 64 Black South African individuals with OI III, between the ages of three months and 18 years, were identified and were dentally assessed. Fifty-five of these individuals had received or were receiving bisphosphonate therapy. This impacted on dental treatment planning and delivery since there is arisk of the complication of bisphosphonate induced osteonecrosis of the jaws. There is a paucity of information regarding the dental management of persons with OI who are receiving bisphosphonate therapy. In particular, orthodontists and maxillofacial surgeons have expressed concern regarding the advisability of orthodontic extractions, tooth movement when faced with the potential for developing osteonecrosis of the jaws. In view of these uncertainties, the dental implications of bisphosphonate therapy have been reviewed and discussed in this article. <![CDATA[<b>Part 14. Negligence versus Malpractice: The "Reasonable Man Rule"</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000900009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Bisphosphonate therapy, which is effective in reducing the rate of fracturing, represents a significant advance in the medical management of Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). When administered to affected persons, bisphosphonate therapy is relevant in their dental and craniofacial management. A particular concern is bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaws, a rare but potentially devastating problem. Osteogenesis imperfecta type III (OI III) is relatively common amongst the indigenous Black African population of South Africa. With the co-operation of medical colleagues 64 Black South African individuals with OI III, between the ages of three months and 18 years, were identified and were dentally assessed. Fifty-five of these individuals had received or were receiving bisphosphonate therapy. This impacted on dental treatment planning and delivery since there is arisk of the complication of bisphosphonate induced osteonecrosis of the jaws. There is a paucity of information regarding the dental management of persons with OI who are receiving bisphosphonate therapy. In particular, orthodontists and maxillofacial surgeons have expressed concern regarding the advisability of orthodontic extractions, tooth movement when faced with the potential for developing osteonecrosis of the jaws. In view of these uncertainties, the dental implications of bisphosphonate therapy have been reviewed and discussed in this article. <![CDATA[<b>What's new for the clinician? Summaries of and excerpts from recently published papers</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000900010&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Bisphosphonate therapy, which is effective in reducing the rate of fracturing, represents a significant advance in the medical management of Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI). When administered to affected persons, bisphosphonate therapy is relevant in their dental and craniofacial management. A particular concern is bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis of the jaws, a rare but potentially devastating problem. Osteogenesis imperfecta type III (OI III) is relatively common amongst the indigenous Black African population of South Africa. With the co-operation of medical colleagues 64 Black South African individuals with OI III, between the ages of three months and 18 years, were identified and were dentally assessed. Fifty-five of these individuals had received or were receiving bisphosphonate therapy. This impacted on dental treatment planning and delivery since there is arisk of the complication of bisphosphonate induced osteonecrosis of the jaws. There is a paucity of information regarding the dental management of persons with OI who are receiving bisphosphonate therapy. In particular, orthodontists and maxillofacial surgeons have expressed concern regarding the advisability of orthodontic extractions, tooth movement when faced with the potential for developing osteonecrosis of the jaws. In view of these uncertainties, the dental implications of bisphosphonate therapy have been reviewed and discussed in this article.