Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Dental Journal ]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=0011-851620170005&lang=pt vol. 72 num. 5 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>At sixes and sevens</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000500001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Planning for Financially Independent Retirement</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000500002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt OBJECTIVES: The study investigated whether dentists in South Africa are actively planning for retirement and if they are confident about being able to retire as financially independent. METHODS: An anonymous online questionnaire was used to collect data from private dental practitioners who were members of the South African Dental Association. Stata release 11 was used for descriptive statistical analysis. RESULTS: The majority of the respondents (71%) were male and 42% of respondents were older than 50 years of age. It was mostly the older respondents, namely 71% of 41-50 year old respondents, 94% of 51-60 year old respondents and 72 % of respondents older than 60 years, who were actively planning for financial independence at retirement. More than half of the respondents (54.35%) were not confident that they would be able to retire as financially independent and think they will have to postpone their retirements. CONCLUSION: Retirement planning is much more complex than simply contributing to a pension, provident or retirement annuity fund. Dental schools can play an important role in equipping dentists with the necessary knowledge and skills to enable proper retirement planning, and to encourage early retirement saving and investment to ultimately ensure financially independent retirement. <![CDATA[<b>An assessment of the accuracy of a panoramic radiograph as compared with cone-beam tomography in TMJ imaging</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000500003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The articular disc of the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) cannot be seen on plain x-ray examination but an accurate assessment of the space between the glenoid fossa and the head of the condyle may provide the clinician with a clue to a possible pathological problem. Measurements of the TMJ space seen on panoramic radiographs (PAN) and on cone beam computerised tomographic scans (CBCT) were carried out on films taken of of left and right TMJs of forty-six patients. On each image a vertical line was drawn digitally from the highest point of the condylar head to the glenoid fossa of the temporal bone. The lengths of the lines were recorded on Galileo software and compared using the Bland-Altman statistical test (total sample size 92 joints). Bias was achieved at mean differences of 1.03mm with a p-value of <0.001 which was statistically significant. Left and right TMJ mean values showed a 0.09 mm difference. Age was insignificant at p=0.40. The Levels of Agreement indicated workable concord between the methods although a wide range was evident. <![CDATA[<b>Impacted mandibular third molars: the efficacy of prophylactic antibiotics and chlorhexidine mouthwash in preventing postoperative infections</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000500004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: There are dissenting opinions regarding the efficacy of prophylactic antimicrobial agents in third molar surgery. OBJECTIVE: To determine: 1) The efficacy of a prophylactic antibiotic regimen compared with a chlorhexidine mouthwash in reducing postoperative infections in mandibular third molar surgery. 2) The pattern of presentation and the indications for extraction of mandibular third molars. DESIGN: 100 surgical patients were randomly assigned to two groups (group 1: 15 ml of chlorhexidine rinse for one minute preoperatively. group 2: 2g amoxicillin orally one hour preoperatively. METHODS: Postoperative complications and surgical site infections were assessed seven days postoperatively. The patients' age, gender, type of impaction and indications for extraction were also recorded. Data was analyzed using the statistical package STATA 13.1. RESULTS: The infection rate was 8% and 6% for groups 1 and 2 respectively. No statistically significant difference in surgical wound infection was found between the two groups Mesioangular impaction was the most common type of impaction, and pericoronitis was the most prevalent indication for extraction. CONCLUSION: Amoxicillin and chlorhexidine prophylaxis are equally effective in reducing postoperative infections in third molar surgery. Hence, antibiotic prophylaxis is not indicated for routine administration in non-immunocompromised patients for such procedures. <![CDATA[<b>Electro-surgical management of a peripheral ossifying fibroma</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000500005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The gingiva is often the site of localized growths that are considered to be reactive rather than neoplastic in nature. One of these gingival lesions, seen rather infrequently, is peripheral ossifying fibroma (POF) a condition that predominantly affects women and is usually located in the anterior maxilla. The lesions are pink to red in colour, and firm to hard in consistency depending on their bone content. As enlargement occurs, they may become ulcerated. Concurrent poor oral hygiene and early periodontal disease are commonly seen. In most cases there is no underlying bone involvement evident on the radiograph. The definitive diagnosis is established by histological examination, which reveals the presence of cellular connective tissue with focal calcifications. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice, though the recurrence rate can reach 20%. This article presents a case of POF in a 14yearold female, from whom the tumour was excised using electrosurgery. <![CDATA[<b>Oral medicine case book 74: Marijuana-induced Oral Leukoplakia</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000500006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The gingiva is often the site of localized growths that are considered to be reactive rather than neoplastic in nature. One of these gingival lesions, seen rather infrequently, is peripheral ossifying fibroma (POF) a condition that predominantly affects women and is usually located in the anterior maxilla. The lesions are pink to red in colour, and firm to hard in consistency depending on their bone content. As enlargement occurs, they may become ulcerated. Concurrent poor oral hygiene and early periodontal disease are commonly seen. In most cases there is no underlying bone involvement evident on the radiograph. The definitive diagnosis is established by histological examination, which reveals the presence of cellular connective tissue with focal calcifications. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice, though the recurrence rate can reach 20%. This article presents a case of POF in a 14yearold female, from whom the tumour was excised using electrosurgery. <![CDATA[<b>Maxillo-facial radiology case 151</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000500007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The gingiva is often the site of localized growths that are considered to be reactive rather than neoplastic in nature. One of these gingival lesions, seen rather infrequently, is peripheral ossifying fibroma (POF) a condition that predominantly affects women and is usually located in the anterior maxilla. The lesions are pink to red in colour, and firm to hard in consistency depending on their bone content. As enlargement occurs, they may become ulcerated. Concurrent poor oral hygiene and early periodontal disease are commonly seen. In most cases there is no underlying bone involvement evident on the radiograph. The definitive diagnosis is established by histological examination, which reveals the presence of cellular connective tissue with focal calcifications. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice, though the recurrence rate can reach 20%. This article presents a case of POF in a 14yearold female, from whom the tumour was excised using electrosurgery. <![CDATA[<b>Forensic dentistry case book 9: The "bite mark" that caused confusion</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000500008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The gingiva is often the site of localized growths that are considered to be reactive rather than neoplastic in nature. One of these gingival lesions, seen rather infrequently, is peripheral ossifying fibroma (POF) a condition that predominantly affects women and is usually located in the anterior maxilla. The lesions are pink to red in colour, and firm to hard in consistency depending on their bone content. As enlargement occurs, they may become ulcerated. Concurrent poor oral hygiene and early periodontal disease are commonly seen. In most cases there is no underlying bone involvement evident on the radiograph. The definitive diagnosis is established by histological examination, which reveals the presence of cellular connective tissue with focal calcifications. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice, though the recurrence rate can reach 20%. This article presents a case of POF in a 14yearold female, from whom the tumour was excised using electrosurgery. <![CDATA[<b>Practicing beyond your expertise - Part 10. Who's to blame, who's to name?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000500009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The gingiva is often the site of localized growths that are considered to be reactive rather than neoplastic in nature. One of these gingival lesions, seen rather infrequently, is peripheral ossifying fibroma (POF) a condition that predominantly affects women and is usually located in the anterior maxilla. The lesions are pink to red in colour, and firm to hard in consistency depending on their bone content. As enlargement occurs, they may become ulcerated. Concurrent poor oral hygiene and early periodontal disease are commonly seen. In most cases there is no underlying bone involvement evident on the radiograph. The definitive diagnosis is established by histological examination, which reveals the presence of cellular connective tissue with focal calcifications. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice, though the recurrence rate can reach 20%. This article presents a case of POF in a 14yearold female, from whom the tumour was excised using electrosurgery. <![CDATA[<b>What's new for the clinician? Summaries of and excerpts from recently published papers</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000500010&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The gingiva is often the site of localized growths that are considered to be reactive rather than neoplastic in nature. One of these gingival lesions, seen rather infrequently, is peripheral ossifying fibroma (POF) a condition that predominantly affects women and is usually located in the anterior maxilla. The lesions are pink to red in colour, and firm to hard in consistency depending on their bone content. As enlargement occurs, they may become ulcerated. Concurrent poor oral hygiene and early periodontal disease are commonly seen. In most cases there is no underlying bone involvement evident on the radiograph. The definitive diagnosis is established by histological examination, which reveals the presence of cellular connective tissue with focal calcifications. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice, though the recurrence rate can reach 20%. This article presents a case of POF in a 14yearold female, from whom the tumour was excised using electrosurgery.