Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Dental Journal ]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=0011-851620170001&lang=pt vol. 72 num. 1 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>A reptilian gift … </b><b> painless dentistry</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000100001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Professor Mario Altini. 19 September 1949 - 10 February 2017</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000100002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Professor Mervyn Shear. 24 November 1931 - 24 January 2017</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000100003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>The World looks at Oral Health</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000100004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>The self-perceived sources of stress among dental students at a South African Dental School and their methods of coping</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000100005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Dental students have reported that, as a result of the nature of the dental curriculum, they are under severe stress while studying. AIM: to determine how students perceived the sources of stress and to identify the coping mechanisms used. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional analytical study using a standardized self-administered questionnaire. All dental students registered in 2015 were invited to participate. All data was secured as confidential and anonymous. RESULTS: Responses were received from 224 students (74%, of whom 26% were male). One third of responding males and 45% of responding females reported severe levels of stress. Clinical students reported a significantly higher (p=0.002) prevalence of severe stress over non-clinical students. The most common causes of severe stress were fear of failure (47%) and high workload (38%). The coping mechanisms included sleeping (64%) and watching television (55%). More than a quarter contemplated changing from Dentistry as a result of their perceived stress. Those who reported having severe stress were 1.8 and 2.1 times more likely to quit Dentistry or to commit suicide. CONCLUSION: Females and clinical students reported higher levels of severe stress. Those with severe stress were significantly more likely to contemplate quitting Dentistry or suicide. <![CDATA[<b>Types of dental emergency services provided to dentally fit soldiers in Area Military Health Unit Gauteng, South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000100006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt BACKGROUND: The prevention and treatment of dental diseases are important in maintaining a combat-ready military force. AIM: To determine the type of dental emergency treatments provided over 12 months to soldiers who had been classified as dentally fit. METHODS: A retrospective analysis was carried out of the dental records of members of the South African National Defence Force in Gauteng who had been screened and certified to be dentally fit in 2009. The records of the participants were followed up for a year thereafter to determine the profile of dental emergency treatments rendered. Data analysis included frequencies and correlations using chi-square tests. The level of significance was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: Of the 6352 soldiers deemed to be dentally fit, 1947 (30.7%) returned for treatment within 12 months. Most required dental restorations (59%) followed by extractions (13%) and crown/bridge repairs (12%). In general, males, soldiers between 41 and 50 years, non-commissioned officers, Whites and Oral Health Fitness II (OHF) received more dental emergency services compared with their counterparts. CONCLUSIONS: A large number of soldiers previously determined as dentally fit required restorations and extractions within a year. The treatment procedure profile was influenced by OHF classification, race, age and military rank. <![CDATA[<b>Analysis of the need for, and scope of training in, maxillo-facial prosthodontics in the South African dental technology programme</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000100007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt PURPOSE: To investigate the need for additional training for dental technologists in the field of maxillo-facial prosthodontics (MFP), and to try to seek consensus on the scope of that training. METHOD: There were four phases: Phase 1 investigated current curricula; Phase 2, completion of questionnaires by students, qualified dental technicians and technologists, and clinicians; Phase 3, interviews with the Heads of the three Universities of Technology and the Heads of the department responsible for MFP at the four Dental Schools; and Phase 4, a Delphi survey amongst technicians and clinicians using questions derived from the previous phases. RESULTS: There was widespread agreement that the current dental technology curriculum did not cover sufficient aspects of MFP to provide graduates with the required skills, and that a postgraduate course should be initiated. However, technicians agreed whilst clinicians were against, whether a maxillo-facial technologist should be permitted to work with patients and carry out clinical procedures. There was general consensus that a one-year full-time course was required. CONCLUSIONS: A postgraduate course should be instituted to improve the training of dental technologists in MFP. The South African Dental Technicians' Council should initiate workshops to determine the curriculum, and the regulation of the maxillo-facial technologist. <![CDATA[<b>How effective are resin-based sealants in preventing caries when placed under field conditions?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000100008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Fissure sealants are considered to be amongst the most effective, least invasive, primary preventive measures against occlusal caries, but surprisingly are not that commonly used. This cross-sectional comparative study evaluated the retention rate and effectiveness in preventing caries of resin-based (RB) fissure sealants that were placed on the occlusal surfaces of the first permanent molar teeth under field conditions on Grade One learners in a rural low socio-economic area community. The control population was a matched sample of Grade Two children. Dental caries and sealant retention were determined by a calibrated examiner who was not involved in the placement of the sealants. On the 12 month follow-up, the caries incidence rate on fissure sealed first permanent molar teeth was 7.1%, while that of the control group was 9.1%, a non-significant result (p=0.39). Sealant retention was also lower than generally reported, only 7.8% being fully intact after 12 months. The placement of resin-based fissure sealants under sub-optimal conditions in the field was not found to be beneficial in reducing the incidence of dental caries. There may be a need for different types of sealant materials to be made available in the public sector for optimal effectiveness. <![CDATA[<b>Continuous education in sedation: Pre-sedation assessment, the medical history questionnaire</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000100009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Fissure sealants are considered to be amongst the most effective, least invasive, primary preventive measures against occlusal caries, but surprisingly are not that commonly used. This cross-sectional comparative study evaluated the retention rate and effectiveness in preventing caries of resin-based (RB) fissure sealants that were placed on the occlusal surfaces of the first permanent molar teeth under field conditions on Grade One learners in a rural low socio-economic area community. The control population was a matched sample of Grade Two children. Dental caries and sealant retention were determined by a calibrated examiner who was not involved in the placement of the sealants. On the 12 month follow-up, the caries incidence rate on fissure sealed first permanent molar teeth was 7.1%, while that of the control group was 9.1%, a non-significant result (p=0.39). Sealant retention was also lower than generally reported, only 7.8% being fully intact after 12 months. The placement of resin-based fissure sealants under sub-optimal conditions in the field was not found to be beneficial in reducing the incidence of dental caries. There may be a need for different types of sealant materials to be made available in the public sector for optimal effectiveness. <![CDATA[<b>Insights into the clinical effectiveness of whitening products. Part 2 Dentist-supervised-at-home LED gel bleaching product</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000100010&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt This section of the report is about the success of a dentist-supervised-at home LED gel tooth whitener, giving the results of a clinical study. The product (LED light gel with 44% carbamide peroxide) was applied by the dentist on teeth 11 and 21 in the chair for 10 minutes. The process was repeated three times, followed by an at-home treatment period (30 minutes/day) of 14 days with 35% carbamide peroxide. The treatment was as outlined by the manufacturers. The L* value improved (more white) after the in-chair treatment with the LED system but showed no further significant increase after the 14 day at-home treatment. However, the b* value improved (less yellow), after both the LED treatment and 14 day at-home treatment. The a* value did not improve significantly throughout the treatments. The LED system provides in-chair tooth whitening after a 14 day treatment although not as effectively as does Opalescence. <![CDATA[<b>Local anaesthetics in dentistry: A series</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000100011&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Failure in local anaesthesia in dentistry is not uncommon with failure rates ranging approximately between 15% and 30%, especially for the inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB). In fact of all the nerve blocks which may be administered in the human body the IANB has the highest failure rate (Malamed, 2012). Therefore, the aim of this series of articles is the discuss some of the causes of failure in local anaesthesia and make recommendations so as to minimize the experience. Current trends like computer controlled local anaesthetic delivery, reversal of soft tissue anaesthesia for patient comfort and "needle free" anaesthesia will be discussed. <![CDATA[<b>Maxillo-facial radiology case 147</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000100012&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Failure in local anaesthesia in dentistry is not uncommon with failure rates ranging approximately between 15% and 30%, especially for the inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB). In fact of all the nerve blocks which may be administered in the human body the IANB has the highest failure rate (Malamed, 2012). Therefore, the aim of this series of articles is the discuss some of the causes of failure in local anaesthesia and make recommendations so as to minimize the experience. Current trends like computer controlled local anaesthetic delivery, reversal of soft tissue anaesthesia for patient comfort and "needle free" anaesthesia will be discussed. <![CDATA[<b>The Research Focus Question: Part 6: Finding the flaws, explaining the errors, and suggesting solutions</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000100013&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Failure in local anaesthesia in dentistry is not uncommon with failure rates ranging approximately between 15% and 30%, especially for the inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB). In fact of all the nerve blocks which may be administered in the human body the IANB has the highest failure rate (Malamed, 2012). Therefore, the aim of this series of articles is the discuss some of the causes of failure in local anaesthesia and make recommendations so as to minimize the experience. Current trends like computer controlled local anaesthetic delivery, reversal of soft tissue anaesthesia for patient comfort and "needle free" anaesthesia will be discussed. <![CDATA[<b>A patient suggests fraudulent behaviour</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000100014&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Failure in local anaesthesia in dentistry is not uncommon with failure rates ranging approximately between 15% and 30%, especially for the inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB). In fact of all the nerve blocks which may be administered in the human body the IANB has the highest failure rate (Malamed, 2012). Therefore, the aim of this series of articles is the discuss some of the causes of failure in local anaesthesia and make recommendations so as to minimize the experience. Current trends like computer controlled local anaesthetic delivery, reversal of soft tissue anaesthesia for patient comfort and "needle free" anaesthesia will be discussed. <![CDATA[<b>What's new for the clinician? Summaries of and excerpts from recently published papers</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162017000100015&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Failure in local anaesthesia in dentistry is not uncommon with failure rates ranging approximately between 15% and 30%, especially for the inferior alveolar nerve block (IANB). In fact of all the nerve blocks which may be administered in the human body the IANB has the highest failure rate (Malamed, 2012). Therefore, the aim of this series of articles is the discuss some of the causes of failure in local anaesthesia and make recommendations so as to minimize the experience. Current trends like computer controlled local anaesthetic delivery, reversal of soft tissue anaesthesia for patient comfort and "needle free" anaesthesia will be discussed.