Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Dental Journal ]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=0011-851620160004&lang=pt vol. 71 num. 4 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Chimes of the Times</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000400001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Energising the executive</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000400002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Methamphetamine abuse</b><b>: </b><b>Oral symptoms and dental treatment needs</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000400003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt BACKGROUND: Methamphetamine: a highly addictive drug commonly used in South Africa. Users often present with poor oral hygiene, grossly decayed teeth and complain of a dry mouth. The prevalence of dental caries among users is high. METHODS: A cross-sectional study design was used with a convenience sample of 308 self-reported methamphetamine users who were part of an in- or out-patient rehabilitation programme at one of 22 specialised substance addiction treatment centres in the Western Cape. RESULTS: The majority were in their late twenties, unemployed and not satisfied with the appearance of their teeth. A dry mouth and a bad taste were the most common symptoms reported. More than three quarters reported 'stiff' facial muscles and more than half, grinding of their teeth. The most common reason for the last dental visit was toothache and the most common treatment at that visit was dental extraction. CONCLUSION: Lower levels of education were associated with increased numbers of extractions and a higher probability of poor oral health. Xerostomia, a bad taste and 'stiff' facial muscles were the most common symptoms reported. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: A thorough intra-oral examination together with comprehensive note taking is crucial for the management of patients abusing methamphetamine. <![CDATA[<b>Parental perspectives on self-care practices and dental sealants as preventive measures for dental caries</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000400004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The oral health behaviour of children is increasingly seen to be driven and shaped by parental influences. AIM AND OBJECTIVES: The study set out to explore parental understanding of dental caries, self-care practices, and dental sealants as preventive strategies for dental caries. METHODS: This was an explorative and cross-sectional study. The participants were parents/care-givers (n=295) of grade one learners. Twelve schools were selected from the Chatsworth Circuit, KwaZulu-Natal, using a systematic sampling technique. Information was obtained through the use of a self-administered questionnaire and focus group discussions. RESULTS: Seventy-four percent of respondents reported that unhealthy deciduous teeth can lead to problems when permanent teeth develop (p<0.001). Although the majority of respondents understood the role of diet and self-care practices, almost 80% of these respondents did not floss and 70% did not use a mouth rinse. Sixty-five percent were aware of dental sealants and these parents were twice as likely to be willing to have sealant placements performed on their children than those parents who were unaware of the procedure (OR 2.32, p<0.001). CONCLUSION: Parental knowledge and awareness of oral health self-care practices does appear to translate into support for dental sealants as a preventive strategy for dental caries. <![CDATA[<b>Salivary cortisol level and severity of xerostomia in patients who stutter</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000400005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt BACKGROUND: Stuttering is associated with high levels of anxiety. Salivary cortisol is used as a biomarker to assess stress level. Dry mouth is one of the symptoms of anxiety. The aim of this study was to evaluate salivary cortisol levels and severity of xerostomia in men with and without stuttering. METHODS: In a case-control study, 19 patients with stuttering (PWS) and 19 control individuals were recruited to the investigation. The xerostomia inventory (XI) score was used as an index of the severity of xerostomia. The salivary cortisol concentration was measured by an enzyme immunoassay kit (ELISA). Student's t-test was used in the statistical analysis. RESULTS: The mean unstimulated saliva flow rate was lower (P=0.045), and the mean unstimulated saliva concentration of cortisol (P=0.017) and XI score (P= 0.044) were significantly higher in the PWS than in control individuals. CONCLUSION: It can be concluded that saliva levels of cortisol and severity of xerostomia are high in stutterers and these patients suffer xerostomia. <![CDATA[<b>Incidence and predisposing factors for dry socket following extraction of permanent teeth at a regional hospital in Kwa-Zulu Natal</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000400006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Dry socket is one of the complications which may follow dental extractions. Whilst the exact pathogenesis is unknown, blood clot disintegration as a result of fibrinolysis remains the most acknowledged theory. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence, distribution by tooth type and location and predisposing factors for dry socket in a public health facility. METHODS: A retrospective review of the register and the records of patients who presented with dry socket at the facility were reviewed for the first quarter of 2015 (January-March). The following data were recorded: total number of patients their demographics, total number of permanent teeth extracted, number of dry sockets encountered and associated risk factors such as smoking, contraception and systemic illnesses. RESULTS: 2214 patients were reviewed from whom a total of 2281 permanent teeth had been extracted. The overall incidence of dry socket was 1.8%, being more prevalent in females, in the second and third decades of life, and in mandibular teeth, more specifically in molars. CONCLUSION: Dry socket occurrence is a painful but infrequent complication of tooth extraction and most commonly affects the mandibular sockets. Oral contraception and smoking independently or in combination with a traumatic extraction were the most prevalent predisposing factors. <![CDATA[<b>An audit of root canal treatments completed by students and dentists at an academic hospital</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000400007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Dry socket is one of the complications which may follow dental extractions. Whilst the exact pathogenesis is unknown, blood clot disintegration as a result of fibrinolysis remains the most acknowledged theory. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence, distribution by tooth type and location and predisposing factors for dry socket in a public health facility. METHODS: A retrospective review of the register and the records of patients who presented with dry socket at the facility were reviewed for the first quarter of 2015 (January-March). The following data were recorded: total number of patients their demographics, total number of permanent teeth extracted, number of dry sockets encountered and associated risk factors such as smoking, contraception and systemic illnesses. RESULTS: 2214 patients were reviewed from whom a total of 2281 permanent teeth had been extracted. The overall incidence of dry socket was 1.8%, being more prevalent in females, in the second and third decades of life, and in mandibular teeth, more specifically in molars. CONCLUSION: Dry socket occurrence is a painful but infrequent complication of tooth extraction and most commonly affects the mandibular sockets. Oral contraception and smoking independently or in combination with a traumatic extraction were the most prevalent predisposing factors. <![CDATA[<b>Introduction to Dental Lasers</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000400008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Dry socket is one of the complications which may follow dental extractions. Whilst the exact pathogenesis is unknown, blood clot disintegration as a result of fibrinolysis remains the most acknowledged theory. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence, distribution by tooth type and location and predisposing factors for dry socket in a public health facility. METHODS: A retrospective review of the register and the records of patients who presented with dry socket at the facility were reviewed for the first quarter of 2015 (January-March). The following data were recorded: total number of patients their demographics, total number of permanent teeth extracted, number of dry sockets encountered and associated risk factors such as smoking, contraception and systemic illnesses. RESULTS: 2214 patients were reviewed from whom a total of 2281 permanent teeth had been extracted. The overall incidence of dry socket was 1.8%, being more prevalent in females, in the second and third decades of life, and in mandibular teeth, more specifically in molars. CONCLUSION: Dry socket occurrence is a painful but infrequent complication of tooth extraction and most commonly affects the mandibular sockets. Oral contraception and smoking independently or in combination with a traumatic extraction were the most prevalent predisposing factors. <![CDATA[<b>Evidence based clinical efficacy of glass-ionomers as tooth restorations and fissure sealants</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000400009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Dry socket is one of the complications which may follow dental extractions. Whilst the exact pathogenesis is unknown, blood clot disintegration as a result of fibrinolysis remains the most acknowledged theory. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence, distribution by tooth type and location and predisposing factors for dry socket in a public health facility. METHODS: A retrospective review of the register and the records of patients who presented with dry socket at the facility were reviewed for the first quarter of 2015 (January-March). The following data were recorded: total number of patients their demographics, total number of permanent teeth extracted, number of dry sockets encountered and associated risk factors such as smoking, contraception and systemic illnesses. RESULTS: 2214 patients were reviewed from whom a total of 2281 permanent teeth had been extracted. The overall incidence of dry socket was 1.8%, being more prevalent in females, in the second and third decades of life, and in mandibular teeth, more specifically in molars. CONCLUSION: Dry socket occurrence is a painful but infrequent complication of tooth extraction and most commonly affects the mandibular sockets. Oral contraception and smoking independently or in combination with a traumatic extraction were the most prevalent predisposing factors. <![CDATA[<b>Professionalism</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000400010&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Dry socket is one of the complications which may follow dental extractions. Whilst the exact pathogenesis is unknown, blood clot disintegration as a result of fibrinolysis remains the most acknowledged theory. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence, distribution by tooth type and location and predisposing factors for dry socket in a public health facility. METHODS: A retrospective review of the register and the records of patients who presented with dry socket at the facility were reviewed for the first quarter of 2015 (January-March). The following data were recorded: total number of patients their demographics, total number of permanent teeth extracted, number of dry sockets encountered and associated risk factors such as smoking, contraception and systemic illnesses. RESULTS: 2214 patients were reviewed from whom a total of 2281 permanent teeth had been extracted. The overall incidence of dry socket was 1.8%, being more prevalent in females, in the second and third decades of life, and in mandibular teeth, more specifically in molars. CONCLUSION: Dry socket occurrence is a painful but infrequent complication of tooth extraction and most commonly affects the mandibular sockets. Oral contraception and smoking independently or in combination with a traumatic extraction were the most prevalent predisposing factors. <![CDATA[<b>Maxillo-facial radiology case 140</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000400011&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Dry socket is one of the complications which may follow dental extractions. Whilst the exact pathogenesis is unknown, blood clot disintegration as a result of fibrinolysis remains the most acknowledged theory. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence, distribution by tooth type and location and predisposing factors for dry socket in a public health facility. METHODS: A retrospective review of the register and the records of patients who presented with dry socket at the facility were reviewed for the first quarter of 2015 (January-March). The following data were recorded: total number of patients their demographics, total number of permanent teeth extracted, number of dry sockets encountered and associated risk factors such as smoking, contraception and systemic illnesses. RESULTS: 2214 patients were reviewed from whom a total of 2281 permanent teeth had been extracted. The overall incidence of dry socket was 1.8%, being more prevalent in females, in the second and third decades of life, and in mandibular teeth, more specifically in molars. CONCLUSION: Dry socket occurrence is a painful but infrequent complication of tooth extraction and most commonly affects the mandibular sockets. Oral contraception and smoking independently or in combination with a traumatic extraction were the most prevalent predisposing factors. <![CDATA[<b>What's new for the clinician? Summaries of and excerpts from recently published papers</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000400012&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Dry socket is one of the complications which may follow dental extractions. Whilst the exact pathogenesis is unknown, blood clot disintegration as a result of fibrinolysis remains the most acknowledged theory. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the incidence, distribution by tooth type and location and predisposing factors for dry socket in a public health facility. METHODS: A retrospective review of the register and the records of patients who presented with dry socket at the facility were reviewed for the first quarter of 2015 (January-March). The following data were recorded: total number of patients their demographics, total number of permanent teeth extracted, number of dry sockets encountered and associated risk factors such as smoking, contraception and systemic illnesses. RESULTS: 2214 patients were reviewed from whom a total of 2281 permanent teeth had been extracted. The overall incidence of dry socket was 1.8%, being more prevalent in females, in the second and third decades of life, and in mandibular teeth, more specifically in molars. CONCLUSION: Dry socket occurrence is a painful but infrequent complication of tooth extraction and most commonly affects the mandibular sockets. Oral contraception and smoking independently or in combination with a traumatic extraction were the most prevalent predisposing factors.