Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Dental Journal ]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=0011-851620160003&lang=pt vol. 71 num. 3 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Advance Intelligence</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000300001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>SADA Communique</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000300002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>An <i>i</i><i>n-v</i><i>it</i><i>ro </i>comparison of microleakage between three calcium silicate cements and amalgam</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000300003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt AIM: The purpose of this in-vitro study was to compare the sealing ability of White ProRoot® MTA, MTA Plus™, BiodentineTM and Permite Amalgam when used as root-end filling materials. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 120 single rooted, extracted teeth were endodontically treated. The apical 3 mm of each root was resected, and 3 mm deep root-end cavities were prepared. Specimens were divided into four groups (n=30) and filled with the following materials: ProRoot® MTA, MTA Plus™, Biodentine™, and Permite Amalgam. Specimens were submerged in Indian Ink for 48 hours, and sectioned horizontally in one millimetre increments from the apical end. Dye penetration was measured using a stereomicroscope. RESULTS: Data for different groups was summarised as percentages. Pairwise comparisons between the calcium silicate materials to amalgam were done at the 0.017 level of significance, using Fisher's exact test. Amalgam showed significantly more leakage than the calcium silicate materials (ProRoot® MTA, MTA PlusTM and Biodenti-neTM) (p<0.001). No significant differences in sealing ability were found among the calcium silicate materials. CONCLUSION: Amalgam should be regarded as unsuitable for use as a root-end filling material. Calcium silicate cements should be recommended as the material of choice for root-end filling. <![CDATA[<b>The whitening effect of four different commercial denture cleansers on stained acrylic resin</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000300004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Denture hygiene and denture cleansers are very important for their antimicrobial effect and also in removing stain from the dentures. The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of Steradent, Corega, Dentalmate and Fitty Dent in improving the colour of stained, polished-and unpolished, acrylic specimens and to determine which colour component should be the visual impression factor. Samples of stained acrylic specimens were severally exposed once to one or other of the denture cleansers. The colour components (L*, a* and b*) of the specimens were measured with a spectrophotometer before and after exposure to one of the four products. In general there was only a slight non-significant improvement (p>0.05) in the yellowness (a*) and redness (b*) of the acrylic samples as a result of a single treatment with any of the four stain removal products. However, the L* value was mainly negatively influenced. The differences (ΔE*ab; ΔL*; Δa* and Δb*) between before and after treatment for any one of the four products were also not statistically significant on a 5% level (Kruskal Wallis non-parametric test). CONCLUSION: A small improvement of the yellowness and redness could be seen even after a single treatment. This was found for all four commercially available denture cleansers on polished and on non-polished specimens. From the relative magnitudes of L*, a* and b* which contribute to the overall colour value (ΔE*ab) it was statistically confirmed that the brightness/lightness component (L*) should be the visual impression factor. <![CDATA[<b>Salivary Creatine Kinase MB in myocardial infarction</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000300005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Most biomarkers in the blood and urine can also be detected in salivary samples. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the relationship. between serum and salivary levels of Creatine Kinase MB in patients with acute myocardial infarction. DESIGN: In a case-control study, forty-one patients diagnosed with myocardial infarction and forty- two age and sex- matched controls were enrolled. METHODS: Saliva sampling by the spitting method was performed 12 to 24 hours after myocardial infarction, and in controls, between 9am and 12 noon. Salivary Creatine Kinase MB levels were measured by the photometric method. Mann Whitney U test and Spearman coefficient were used to analyze the data. RESULTS: There was no significant difference between patients with myocardial infarction and the controls in terms of the salivary levels of creatine kinase MB (case: 24 U/l vs. : 19.5 U/l, p=0.30). Patients showed no significant difference in median levels of salivary creatine kinase MB in terms of sex (p=0.69) and previous history of myocardial infarction (p=0.31). In all patients there was a weak positive relationship between serum and salivary levels of creatine kinase MB (rs=0.14, p= 0.39). CONCLUSIONS: Salivary creatine kinase MB level cannot be an indicator for diagnosis of myocardial infarction. <![CDATA[<b>Comparison of a custom made electronic record book database with a traditional student record book for recording clinical procedural credits and continuous clinical assessments in Restorative Dentistry</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000300006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Comparison of a custom designed electronic record book database with a traditional student record book in Dentistry has not been documented. AIM: To develop an electronic record book database (ERBD) to record and calculate continuous clinical assessment (CCA) marks of students in Restorative Dentistry and to compare the efficiency of the ERBD system with the traditional student record book (TSRB). METHODS: Data was obtained from 1276 dental procedures performed by fifty five consenting final year students. Clinical supervisors and students were calibrated to record credits and CCA marks on a designated assessment form. In practice, the recorded data were manually transferred to the TSRB on a daily basis. The ERBD was designed as an electronic Excel® spreadsheet which enabled daily automatic calculating and updating of credits and CCA marks for each student. After a month the times taken to transfer these data from the TSRB and the ERBD to electronic class lists were recorded in minutes and analysed using the Student's t-test. RESULTS: Significant differences (p < 0.0001) between the times were recorded. : The administrative procedure was 14 times faster when the ERBD was used. CONCLUSION: The ERBD was significantly more efficient than the TSRB. <![CDATA[<b>Adolescent caries management: An interdisciplinary approach</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000300007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Adolescent caries is a new and growing challenge in restorative dentistry. Dental aesthetics has become a popular topic in all the disciplines in dentistry. When a makeover is planned to enhance the aesthetic appearance of the teeth of a patient, the clinician must have a logical diagnostic approach that results in the appropriate treatment plan. With some patients, the restorative dentist cannot accomplish the correction alone, but may require the assistance of colleagues in other dental disciplines. This case describes a unique approach to interdisciplinary dental diagnosis, beginning with aesthetics but encompassing structure, function and biology to achieve an optimal result. Providing education about risk factors for dental caries, such as consumption of sugars and poor oral hygiene, together with the introduction of preventive strategies, not only assists in meeting the special oral needs of the adolescent population, but also helps in the establishment of lifelong healthy habits. <![CDATA[<b>Previously undiagnosed MVA trauma to TMJ</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000300008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Adolescent caries is a new and growing challenge in restorative dentistry. Dental aesthetics has become a popular topic in all the disciplines in dentistry. When a makeover is planned to enhance the aesthetic appearance of the teeth of a patient, the clinician must have a logical diagnostic approach that results in the appropriate treatment plan. With some patients, the restorative dentist cannot accomplish the correction alone, but may require the assistance of colleagues in other dental disciplines. This case describes a unique approach to interdisciplinary dental diagnosis, beginning with aesthetics but encompassing structure, function and biology to achieve an optimal result. Providing education about risk factors for dental caries, such as consumption of sugars and poor oral hygiene, together with the introduction of preventive strategies, not only assists in meeting the special oral needs of the adolescent population, but also helps in the establishment of lifelong healthy habits. <![CDATA[<b>Oral medicine case book 73: HIV associated oral ulcerations differential diagnosis</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000300009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Adolescent caries is a new and growing challenge in restorative dentistry. Dental aesthetics has become a popular topic in all the disciplines in dentistry. When a makeover is planned to enhance the aesthetic appearance of the teeth of a patient, the clinician must have a logical diagnostic approach that results in the appropriate treatment plan. With some patients, the restorative dentist cannot accomplish the correction alone, but may require the assistance of colleagues in other dental disciplines. This case describes a unique approach to interdisciplinary dental diagnosis, beginning with aesthetics but encompassing structure, function and biology to achieve an optimal result. Providing education about risk factors for dental caries, such as consumption of sugars and poor oral hygiene, together with the introduction of preventive strategies, not only assists in meeting the special oral needs of the adolescent population, but also helps in the establishment of lifelong healthy habits. <![CDATA[<b>Maxillo-facial radiology case 139</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000300010&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Adolescent caries is a new and growing challenge in restorative dentistry. Dental aesthetics has become a popular topic in all the disciplines in dentistry. When a makeover is planned to enhance the aesthetic appearance of the teeth of a patient, the clinician must have a logical diagnostic approach that results in the appropriate treatment plan. With some patients, the restorative dentist cannot accomplish the correction alone, but may require the assistance of colleagues in other dental disciplines. This case describes a unique approach to interdisciplinary dental diagnosis, beginning with aesthetics but encompassing structure, function and biology to achieve an optimal result. Providing education about risk factors for dental caries, such as consumption of sugars and poor oral hygiene, together with the introduction of preventive strategies, not only assists in meeting the special oral needs of the adolescent population, but also helps in the establishment of lifelong healthy habits. <![CDATA[<b>Oral pathology case book: Metastatic colorectal carcinoma to the mandible</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000300011&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Adolescent caries is a new and growing challenge in restorative dentistry. Dental aesthetics has become a popular topic in all the disciplines in dentistry. When a makeover is planned to enhance the aesthetic appearance of the teeth of a patient, the clinician must have a logical diagnostic approach that results in the appropriate treatment plan. With some patients, the restorative dentist cannot accomplish the correction alone, but may require the assistance of colleagues in other dental disciplines. This case describes a unique approach to interdisciplinary dental diagnosis, beginning with aesthetics but encompassing structure, function and biology to achieve an optimal result. Providing education about risk factors for dental caries, such as consumption of sugars and poor oral hygiene, together with the introduction of preventive strategies, not only assists in meeting the special oral needs of the adolescent population, but also helps in the establishment of lifelong healthy habits. <![CDATA[<b>Vicarious liability - it's a risky business</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000300012&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Adolescent caries is a new and growing challenge in restorative dentistry. Dental aesthetics has become a popular topic in all the disciplines in dentistry. When a makeover is planned to enhance the aesthetic appearance of the teeth of a patient, the clinician must have a logical diagnostic approach that results in the appropriate treatment plan. With some patients, the restorative dentist cannot accomplish the correction alone, but may require the assistance of colleagues in other dental disciplines. This case describes a unique approach to interdisciplinary dental diagnosis, beginning with aesthetics but encompassing structure, function and biology to achieve an optimal result. Providing education about risk factors for dental caries, such as consumption of sugars and poor oral hygiene, together with the introduction of preventive strategies, not only assists in meeting the special oral needs of the adolescent population, but also helps in the establishment of lifelong healthy habits. <![CDATA[<b>What's new for the clinician? Summaries of and excerpts from recently published papers</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162016000300013&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Adolescent caries is a new and growing challenge in restorative dentistry. Dental aesthetics has become a popular topic in all the disciplines in dentistry. When a makeover is planned to enhance the aesthetic appearance of the teeth of a patient, the clinician must have a logical diagnostic approach that results in the appropriate treatment plan. With some patients, the restorative dentist cannot accomplish the correction alone, but may require the assistance of colleagues in other dental disciplines. This case describes a unique approach to interdisciplinary dental diagnosis, beginning with aesthetics but encompassing structure, function and biology to achieve an optimal result. Providing education about risk factors for dental caries, such as consumption of sugars and poor oral hygiene, together with the introduction of preventive strategies, not only assists in meeting the special oral needs of the adolescent population, but also helps in the establishment of lifelong healthy habits.