Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Dental Journal ]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=0011-851620150010&lang=pt vol. 70 num. 10 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Procedural Sedation and Analgesia (PSA), an alternative to general anaesthesia for surgical procedures outside the hospital environment</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162015001000001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Oral manifestations of Tuberculosis: The role of the dentist</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162015001000002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Oral health and subjective psychological well-being among South African Adults: Findings from a national household survey</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162015001000003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between oral health and socioeconomic status with subjective psychological well-being. METHODS: An interviewer-administered questionnaire was conducted during 2011 on a nationally representative sample of South African adults >16 years (n=2,971) who reported on socio-demographic data, past dental visit patterns, number of remaining teeth and oral and general health status. Subjective well-being was computed as the sum of scores obtained from participants' estimates of level of happiness (scale 0-6) and rating of level of satisfaction with life (scale 0-4). Analyses included t-tests and multivariable-adjusted Poisson regression. RESULTS: The average score on a scale of 0-10 for subjective well-being was 6.31 (95%CI=6.17-6.44), which decreased with age, but increased with level of education and frequency of dental visits. Even after controlling for socioeconomic status, those who rated their oral health as good were more likely to report a higher subjective well-being (Prevalence Rate ratio (PRR) =1.14; 95% CI=1.03-1.27). Those who reported visiting a dentist at least every 6 months reported higher subjective well-being (PRR=1.10; 1.04-1.16. CONCLUSIONS: Good oral health is independently associated with greater subjective well-being. This highlights the need to prioritise oral health promotion as an integral part of promoting general health and improving the quality of life of South Africans. <![CDATA[<b>Patient satisfaction during and following procedural sedation for ambulatory surgery</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162015001000004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt BACKGROUND: Patient satisfaction is multidimensional. The clinician's perspective of a good outcome and the patient's experience of a satisfactory service are often two different end-points. The primary aim of our study was to assess the perioperative experience of patients undergoing procedural sedation. A secondary aim was to create a postoperative questionnaire which could be used as a measurement tool. The questions could also be used as an audit to assist with adherence to quality assurance and clinical governance. METHOD: A questionnaire was compiled to attempt to assess the perioperative aspects of procedural sedation. Five hundred consecutive patients undergoing procedural sedation for dental-related outpatient procedures were asked to complete a questionnaire. Patients who didn't complete it were excluded. Ninety-eight per cent of the patients returned the questionnaire and 489 questionnaires were evaluated. RESULTS: A total of 489 patients were included. Ninety-three per cent of the patients expressed a good (7+/10) overall experience of procedural sedation, and 92.6% indicated that they would recommend it to others. CONCLUSION: Our study population showed a high level of satisfaction with their sedation experience. It is suggested that the devised questionnaire could be used successfully in future as an assessment tool or audit of patient satisfaction following procedural sedation for ambulatory surgery. <![CDATA[<b>Platelet- Rich Fibrin (PRF) - The effect of storage time on platelet concentration</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162015001000005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt The aim of this study was to determine whether storage time had a significant effect on the platelet concentration of platelet-rich fibrin (PRF). Three blood samples were drawn from each participant into a sterile blood sampling tube. Two of the blood samples were centrifuged to form PRF. The third non-centrifuged sample was used to measure the baseline blood platelet concentration. After PRF had formed, it was removed from the respective test tubes at different time intervals i.e. immediately after centrifugation (Group A) and after 60 min of storage time in the blood collecting tube (Group B). The residual blood from each group was tested for platelet concentration and compared with the baseline reading (as an indirect measure of the platelet concentrate of PRF). The PRF produced in Group A (PRF A) had a mean platelet concentration of 274 ±57.8x10(9)/L, whereas the PRF of Group B (PRF B) was 278 ± 58.2x10(9)/L. A statistically significant difference was seen between the groups (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Storage time has a significant effect on the platelet concentration of PRF. Further research is required to determine whether this has any clinical relevance. <![CDATA[<b>An <i>in vitro </i>comparison of different techniques for glide path preparation</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162015001000006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: The study compared modification of canal curvature and the incidence of canal aberrations after glide path preparation using four different instrumentation techniques. METHODS: One hundred and twenty S-shaped Endo-Training-Blocks were selected, the canals coloured with ink and digital images acquired. Glide paths were prepared by a single operator with stainless steel K-files by hand (Group 1), stainless steel K-files in a reciprocating hand piece (Group 2), PathFile (Group 3) and X-Plorer files (Group 4). Pre-instrumentation and post-instrumentation images were superimposed to evaluate the parameters investigated. The images were also examined by three blinded operators for the presence of aberrations. Differences in canal curvature modification were analysed with respect to logarithmic transformed change from baseline using ANCOVA (p<0.001) with logarithmic transformed pre-instrumentation values as covariate. The incidence of canal aberrations was analyzed using Fisher's exact test (p<0.05). RESULTS: There was no difference between PathFiles and X-Plorer files (p<0.001) and both systems demonstrated significantly less modification of curvature compared with hand files and hand files in a reciprocating hand-piece (p<0.001). The Groups differed significantly regarding the number of aberrations (p=0.005). Hand files and hand files in the reciprocating hand piece did not differ statistically (p=0.254; 20% and 6.67%). However, hand files in reciprocating hand piece also did not differ significantly from PathFiles and X-Plorer files (p=0.326). There were no aberrations detected in the rotary NiTi Groups. CONCLUSION: The stainless steel K-files in the reciprocating hand-piece performed better than their use by hand only. Overall, PathFiles and X-Plorer files equally demonstrated the least modification to original canal geometry. Further research utilising the different techniques in extracted teeth is warranted. <![CDATA[<b>Assessing extent of undergraduate training in maxillo-facial surgery and the related skill levels amongst public service dentists</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162015001000007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt AIM: To assess the level of maxillofacial surgical skills amongst dentists in the Public Oral Health Services. OBJECTIVES: To determine the level of training dentists had received in maxillofacial surgical skills during their undergraduate studies. To identify the training needs of dentists working in the public oral health sector. METHODS: A self-administered questionnaire was designed and sent to 96 dentists who were employed in the Public Oral Health Services between 2011 and 2012. The questionnaire elicited information on demographics and on the levels of undergraduate training the dentists had received in oral surgical skills. RESULTS: Seventy replies were received, a response rate of 73%. Respondents had received undergraduate training in the following procedures: surgical removal of impacted teeth 85.7%, closed reduction of fractured jaws 72.9%, placement of dental implants 14.3%, and incisional biopsies, 72.9%. Postgraduate training was considered required before attempting surgical removal of impacted third molars (41.4%), closed reduction of fractured jaws (67.1%), incisional (61.7%) and excisional (56.3 %) biopsies. CONCLUSION: Dentists working in the Public Oral Health Services believed that their undergraduate training in maxillofacial surgery did not equip them to perform more complex surgical procedures with skill and confidence. <![CDATA[<b>The use of Laser-based Technologies in dentistry: Ethical issues and safety considerations</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162015001000008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt AIM: To assess the level of maxillofacial surgical skills amongst dentists in the Public Oral Health Services. OBJECTIVES: To determine the level of training dentists had received in maxillofacial surgical skills during their undergraduate studies. To identify the training needs of dentists working in the public oral health sector. METHODS: A self-administered questionnaire was designed and sent to 96 dentists who were employed in the Public Oral Health Services between 2011 and 2012. The questionnaire elicited information on demographics and on the levels of undergraduate training the dentists had received in oral surgical skills. RESULTS: Seventy replies were received, a response rate of 73%. Respondents had received undergraduate training in the following procedures: surgical removal of impacted teeth 85.7%, closed reduction of fractured jaws 72.9%, placement of dental implants 14.3%, and incisional biopsies, 72.9%. Postgraduate training was considered required before attempting surgical removal of impacted third molars (41.4%), closed reduction of fractured jaws (67.1%), incisional (61.7%) and excisional (56.3 %) biopsies. CONCLUSION: Dentists working in the Public Oral Health Services believed that their undergraduate training in maxillofacial surgery did not equip them to perform more complex surgical procedures with skill and confidence. <![CDATA[<b>What's new for the clinician?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162015001000009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt AIM: To assess the level of maxillofacial surgical skills amongst dentists in the Public Oral Health Services. OBJECTIVES: To determine the level of training dentists had received in maxillofacial surgical skills during their undergraduate studies. To identify the training needs of dentists working in the public oral health sector. METHODS: A self-administered questionnaire was designed and sent to 96 dentists who were employed in the Public Oral Health Services between 2011 and 2012. The questionnaire elicited information on demographics and on the levels of undergraduate training the dentists had received in oral surgical skills. RESULTS: Seventy replies were received, a response rate of 73%. Respondents had received undergraduate training in the following procedures: surgical removal of impacted teeth 85.7%, closed reduction of fractured jaws 72.9%, placement of dental implants 14.3%, and incisional biopsies, 72.9%. Postgraduate training was considered required before attempting surgical removal of impacted third molars (41.4%), closed reduction of fractured jaws (67.1%), incisional (61.7%) and excisional (56.3 %) biopsies. CONCLUSION: Dentists working in the Public Oral Health Services believed that their undergraduate training in maxillofacial surgery did not equip them to perform more complex surgical procedures with skill and confidence. <![CDATA[<b>Miriam Schraibman</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162015001000010&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt AIM: To assess the level of maxillofacial surgical skills amongst dentists in the Public Oral Health Services. OBJECTIVES: To determine the level of training dentists had received in maxillofacial surgical skills during their undergraduate studies. To identify the training needs of dentists working in the public oral health sector. METHODS: A self-administered questionnaire was designed and sent to 96 dentists who were employed in the Public Oral Health Services between 2011 and 2012. The questionnaire elicited information on demographics and on the levels of undergraduate training the dentists had received in oral surgical skills. RESULTS: Seventy replies were received, a response rate of 73%. Respondents had received undergraduate training in the following procedures: surgical removal of impacted teeth 85.7%, closed reduction of fractured jaws 72.9%, placement of dental implants 14.3%, and incisional biopsies, 72.9%. Postgraduate training was considered required before attempting surgical removal of impacted third molars (41.4%), closed reduction of fractured jaws (67.1%), incisional (61.7%) and excisional (56.3 %) biopsies. CONCLUSION: Dentists working in the Public Oral Health Services believed that their undergraduate training in maxillofacial surgery did not equip them to perform more complex surgical procedures with skill and confidence.