Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Dental Journal ]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=0011-851620140010&lang=pt vol. 69 num. 10 lang. pt <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Abuse and oral health</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162014001000001&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Response to sugar letter</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162014001000002&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>SADA Communique</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162014001000003&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>A World Congress focussing on Geriatric Dentistry</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162014001000004&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt <![CDATA[<b>Knowledge, attitudes and practices of oral health care workers in Lesotho regarding the management of patients with oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162014001000005&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Lesotho has the third highest prevalence of HIV In the world with an estimated 23% of the adult population infected. At least 70% of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) have presented with oral manifestation of HIV as the first sign of the disease. Oral health workers regularly encounter patients presenting with oral lesions associated with HIV disease and therefore need to have adequate knowledge of these conditions for diagnosis and management. The aim of the present study was to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of oral health care workers (OHCW) of Lesotho regarding the management of oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted on all 46 OHCW in 26 public and private care facilities in all ten districts of Lesotho. A self-administered questionnaire was used to gather information. The response rate was 100%. Nearly all (94.7%) agreed that oral lesions are common in people living with HIV and/or AIDS. The majority (91.3%) named oral candidiasis (OC) as the most common lesion found in PLWHA while Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS) (34.7%) and Oral Hairy Leukoplakia (OHL) (32.6%) were mentioned as the least common oral lesions of HIV. Most correctly identified the images of oral candidiasis (97.8%), angular cheilitis (86.9%) and herpes zoster (80.4%). Only 16.7% felt they had comprehensive knowledge of oral HIV lesions, although 84.8% reported having previously received training. Almost three quarters (71%) reported that there was no need to treat HIV positive patients differently from HIV negative patients. OHCW in Lesotho demonstrated high confidence levels in their competence in managing dental patients with oral lesions associated with HIV, however, they lacked an in-depth knowledge in this regard. Amongst this group there is a need for comprehensive training with regards to diagnosis and management of oral lesions of HIV including the training of other cadres of health care workers together with nurses and community health workers. <![CDATA[<b>Substance abuse and maxillofacial injuries</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162014001000006&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Lesotho has the third highest prevalence of HIV In the world with an estimated 23% of the adult population infected. At least 70% of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) have presented with oral manifestation of HIV as the first sign of the disease. Oral health workers regularly encounter patients presenting with oral lesions associated with HIV disease and therefore need to have adequate knowledge of these conditions for diagnosis and management. The aim of the present study was to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of oral health care workers (OHCW) of Lesotho regarding the management of oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted on all 46 OHCW in 26 public and private care facilities in all ten districts of Lesotho. A self-administered questionnaire was used to gather information. The response rate was 100%. Nearly all (94.7%) agreed that oral lesions are common in people living with HIV and/or AIDS. The majority (91.3%) named oral candidiasis (OC) as the most common lesion found in PLWHA while Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS) (34.7%) and Oral Hairy Leukoplakia (OHL) (32.6%) were mentioned as the least common oral lesions of HIV. Most correctly identified the images of oral candidiasis (97.8%), angular cheilitis (86.9%) and herpes zoster (80.4%). Only 16.7% felt they had comprehensive knowledge of oral HIV lesions, although 84.8% reported having previously received training. Almost three quarters (71%) reported that there was no need to treat HIV positive patients differently from HIV negative patients. OHCW in Lesotho demonstrated high confidence levels in their competence in managing dental patients with oral lesions associated with HIV, however, they lacked an in-depth knowledge in this regard. Amongst this group there is a need for comprehensive training with regards to diagnosis and management of oral lesions of HIV including the training of other cadres of health care workers together with nurses and community health workers. <![CDATA[<b>A novel use of the Reciproc R25 Endodontic file for root canal obturation</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162014001000007&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Lesotho has the third highest prevalence of HIV In the world with an estimated 23% of the adult population infected. At least 70% of people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) have presented with oral manifestation of HIV as the first sign of the disease. Oral health workers regularly encounter patients presenting with oral lesions associated with HIV disease and therefore need to have adequate knowledge of these conditions for diagnosis and management. The aim of the present study was to determine the knowledge, attitudes and practices of oral health care workers (OHCW) of Lesotho regarding the management of oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS. A descriptive cross-sectional survey was conducted on all 46 OHCW in 26 public and private care facilities in all ten districts of Lesotho. A self-administered questionnaire was used to gather information. The response rate was 100%. Nearly all (94.7%) agreed that oral lesions are common in people living with HIV and/or AIDS. The majority (91.3%) named oral candidiasis (OC) as the most common lesion found in PLWHA while Kaposi's Sarcoma (KS) (34.7%) and Oral Hairy Leukoplakia (OHL) (32.6%) were mentioned as the least common oral lesions of HIV. Most correctly identified the images of oral candidiasis (97.8%), angular cheilitis (86.9%) and herpes zoster (80.4%). Only 16.7% felt they had comprehensive knowledge of oral HIV lesions, although 84.8% reported having previously received training. Almost three quarters (71%) reported that there was no need to treat HIV positive patients differently from HIV negative patients. OHCW in Lesotho demonstrated high confidence levels in their competence in managing dental patients with oral lesions associated with HIV, however, they lacked an in-depth knowledge in this regard. Amongst this group there is a need for comprehensive training with regards to diagnosis and management of oral lesions of HIV including the training of other cadres of health care workers together with nurses and community health workers. <![CDATA[<b>Do precursor tests influence the performance of Oral Hygiene students in subsequent semester tests?</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162014001000008&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt INTRODUCTION: Precursor tests may be useful educational tools In dentistry to enhance learning among Oral Hygiene students, but their application and possible effect on the subsequent performance of these students have not been studied AIM: To determine whether precursor tests, used as dental educational and formative assessment tools, influence the performance of undergraduate Oral Hygiene students in ensuing formal semester tests in the discipline of Basic Restorative Dentistry METHODS: This descriptive cross sectional study involved seventeen consenting Oral Hygiene students. An electronic Odontology Theory Test (OTT) and an electronic Objective Structured Practical Test (OSPT), were prepared and introduced as precursor tests prior to scheduled semester tests in the Division of Restorative Dentistry (Department of Odontology). Eleven (65%) of the seventeen students completed the precursor OTT, as well as the precursor OSPT, fourteen days prior to their scheduled semester OTT and semester OSPT and sixty two days prior to their final examinations. The results of the precursor and the semester tests were entered into a Microsoft Excel® database for comparative analysis, using a Student's t-test RESULTS: For both OTT and OSPT tests there were significant differences between the means of the scores of the students for precursor and semester tests (OTT: p = 0.0009; OSPT: p = 0.0180) DISCUSSION: The students performed significantly better in their precursor OTT, whilst their performance in the OSPT was significantly better in the semester test. : In the context of this investigation, the precursor OTT did not enhance the performance of the students in their semester OTT, whilst the precursor OSPT was associated with an enhanced performance of the students in their semester OSPT <![CDATA[<b>Oral medicine case book 65: Necrotising stomatitis</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162014001000009&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Necrotising stomatitis is a fulminating anaerobic poly-bacterial infection affecting predominantly the oral mucosa of debilitated malnourished children or immunosuppressed HIV-seropositive subjects. It starts as necrotising gingivitis which progresses to necrotising periodontitis and subsequently to necrotising stomatitis. In order to prevent the progression of necrotising stomatitis to noma (cancrum oris), affected patients should be vigorously treated and may require admission to hospital. Healthcare personnel should therefore be familiar with the signs and symptoms of necrotising gingivitis/necrotising periodontitis, of their potential sequelae and of the need for immediate therapeutic intervention. <![CDATA[<b>Maxillo-facial radiology case 126</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162014001000010&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Necrotising stomatitis is a fulminating anaerobic poly-bacterial infection affecting predominantly the oral mucosa of debilitated malnourished children or immunosuppressed HIV-seropositive subjects. It starts as necrotising gingivitis which progresses to necrotising periodontitis and subsequently to necrotising stomatitis. In order to prevent the progression of necrotising stomatitis to noma (cancrum oris), affected patients should be vigorously treated and may require admission to hospital. Healthcare personnel should therefore be familiar with the signs and symptoms of necrotising gingivitis/necrotising periodontitis, of their potential sequelae and of the need for immediate therapeutic intervention. <![CDATA[<b>Privacy and disclosure in the consulting room</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162014001000011&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Necrotising stomatitis is a fulminating anaerobic poly-bacterial infection affecting predominantly the oral mucosa of debilitated malnourished children or immunosuppressed HIV-seropositive subjects. It starts as necrotising gingivitis which progresses to necrotising periodontitis and subsequently to necrotising stomatitis. In order to prevent the progression of necrotising stomatitis to noma (cancrum oris), affected patients should be vigorously treated and may require admission to hospital. Healthcare personnel should therefore be familiar with the signs and symptoms of necrotising gingivitis/necrotising periodontitis, of their potential sequelae and of the need for immediate therapeutic intervention. <![CDATA[<b>What's new for the clinician?</b> <b>Summaries of and excerpts from recently published papers</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162014001000012&lng=pt&nrm=iso&tlng=pt Necrotising stomatitis is a fulminating anaerobic poly-bacterial infection affecting predominantly the oral mucosa of debilitated malnourished children or immunosuppressed HIV-seropositive subjects. It starts as necrotising gingivitis which progresses to necrotising periodontitis and subsequently to necrotising stomatitis. In order to prevent the progression of necrotising stomatitis to noma (cancrum oris), affected patients should be vigorously treated and may require admission to hospital. Healthcare personnel should therefore be familiar with the signs and symptoms of necrotising gingivitis/necrotising periodontitis, of their potential sequelae and of the need for immediate therapeutic intervention.