Scielo RSS <![CDATA[South African Dental Journal ]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/rss.php?pid=0011-851620220004&lang=es vol. 77 num. 4 lang. es <![CDATA[SciELO Logo]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/img/en/fbpelogp.gif http://www.scielo.org.za <![CDATA[<b>Artificial Intelligence in Dentistry</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162022000400001&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es <![CDATA[<b>For the sake of the profession, we shall win!</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162022000400002&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es <![CDATA[<b>An evidence-based guide to occlusion and articulation. <i>Part 4: Unworn dentitions</i></b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162022000400003&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es <![CDATA[<b>The perceived business management knowledge and skills of dentists in private practice in South Africa</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162022000400004&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es PURPOSE: This study evaluated the perceived business (practice) management knowledge and skills of dentists involved in the management of a private practice in South Africa by means of a self-administered web-based questionnaire. METHOD: Invited participants were members of the South African Dental Association (numbering 2,462) as well as dentists in their second and third year of practice after graduation (numbering 199). There were 533 respondents but not all of these were involved in management and 63 of these failed to complete the survey, leaving a total of 367 respondents. RESULTS: Overall, the respondents reported that their undergraduate training had not prepared them adequately for the non-clinical aspects of practice management; 56% had not had a formal undergraduate course. However, for those who did, 71% reported that the course was only slightly or not at all useful. Only 29% attended any form of postgraduate course, but only three of these were considered to be effective. Management knowledge and skills were also obtained from accountants as well as financial advisors, friends, family and lawyers CONCLUSION: In line with the opinion expressed by the majority of respondents (86%), it is recommended that appropriate dental practice management courses be introduced throughout the curriculum, preferably in association with a Business School, and that postgraduate courses should be made available for continuous professional development in this field. <![CDATA[<b>A radiographic analysis of Mandibular Symphysis dimension in black South African adult patients with differing skeletal patterns</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162022000400005&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es INTRODUCTION: Orthodontic treatment often involves planned tooth movement within the confined spaces of the alveolar bone trough. Tooth movement within the alveolar trough may be limited by thin labial and lingual cortical plates. Moving lower incisors beyond the mandibular symphysis dimensions may result in damage to roots and alveolar bone.4 Aim and objective: The aim of the study was to evaluate limitation of treatment in different skeletal patterns due to mandibular symphysis dimension in order to evaluate limitations of tooth movement within the confines of the mandibular alveolar trough.The objective was to determine the mandibular symphysis dimensions in subjects with differing skeletal patterns. DESIGN: The design was a retrospective, cross-sectional study. METHODS: A sample of 180 pre-treatment lateral cephalometric radiographs of black South African subjects were stratified into three groups based on their skeletal classification. Each Class was further divided into equal numbers of males and females. Descriptive statistics, Student's t-test, ANOVA test and Pearson correlation coefficient were used to analyse the data and p-values of <0.05 were considered statistically significant. RESULTS: Subjects with skeletal Class I pattern had a greater LA compared to subjects with skeletal Class II pattern. Subjects with skeletal Class I pattern had a greater LH and LA in females than in males. Subjects with skeletal Class III pattern had greater LH in males than in females. <![CDATA[<b>Criteria that must be considered in order to optimise the success of computer aided designed and computer aided manufactured (CAD/CAM) restorations</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162022000400006&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Several factors influence the success or failure of ceramic dental restorations, and need to be considered and understood prior to embarking on these restorations. It is incumbent on the clinician to have an in-depth knowledge on the science of ceramic materials, current bonding agents and techniques, understanding and working proficiency of computer aided design and computer aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) computer hardware and software, an appreciation of oral biology, the role of occlusion and occlusal schemes, as well as recognition and management of patients with parafunctional habits. This paper will cover the principles of cavity preparation and tooth preparation designs, maintenance and / or achievement of inter-arch stability, preservation of marginal integrity, provision of occlusal stability, and digital impression techniques required to optimise accuracy. Provision of a chairside manufactured CAD/CAM dental restoration requires dentists to perform both the clinical and the laboratory aspects of the procedure. The responsibility for the quality of the final restoration thus rests in their hands alone and it is their duty to ensure they are adequately trained and skilled in all aspects of CAD/CAM if they wish to make it part of their practices. <![CDATA[<b>The prevalence and classification of mandibular third molar impactions and associated second molar pathology in a Gauteng population group. <i>A retrospective study.</i></b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162022000400007&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es Several factors influence the success or failure of ceramic dental restorations, and need to be considered and understood prior to embarking on these restorations. It is incumbent on the clinician to have an in-depth knowledge on the science of ceramic materials, current bonding agents and techniques, understanding and working proficiency of computer aided design and computer aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) computer hardware and software, an appreciation of oral biology, the role of occlusion and occlusal schemes, as well as recognition and management of patients with parafunctional habits. This paper will cover the principles of cavity preparation and tooth preparation designs, maintenance and / or achievement of inter-arch stability, preservation of marginal integrity, provision of occlusal stability, and digital impression techniques required to optimise accuracy. Provision of a chairside manufactured CAD/CAM dental restoration requires dentists to perform both the clinical and the laboratory aspects of the procedure. The responsibility for the quality of the final restoration thus rests in their hands alone and it is their duty to ensure they are adequately trained and skilled in all aspects of CAD/CAM if they wish to make it part of their practices. <![CDATA[<b>The psychosocial effect of the COVID-19 national lockdown on Dentistry and Oral Hygiene students</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162022000400008&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 lockdown has had a psychological and social impact on dental students globally. AIM: To determine the psychosocial effect on students enrolled in dentistry and oral hygiene courses at UWC. OBJECTIVES: To determine the psychosocial effects (living conditions, levels of anxiety, fear of COVID-19, and food security levels) experienced by students during the lockdown. DESIGN: A descriptive, cross-sectional study using a quantitative approach was used. METHODS: A randomised sample (n=250), stratified by sex and academic year group, comprising undergraduate oral hygiene BOH total students = 90 and dentistry BDS total students = 450 (UWC, 2020) was used. Data was gathered via an online survey, (Google Forms). Survey questions included the GAD-7, FCV-19S questionnaire, and Food Security scales. RESULTS: The data were analysed using Epi Info 7. The response rate was 36% (n=90); 69.67% were female; the mean age was 22.34 (SD = 2.66); 91% lived with their parents during lockdown. Students' main sources of funding were parents (47%), NSFAS or bursary (42%) and self-funded (11%). Substantial psychosocial effects with high anxiety (33%), fear of COVID-19 (47.3 %), and a lesser effect for food insecurity (FI) (5.49%) was reported. CONCLUSIONS: The study showed that the COVID-19 pandemic has contributed to psychosocial effects in a discipline that under 'normal" conditions is experienced as stressful. This requires educational institutions to develop a targeted approach through relevant support systems that would identify vulnerable students at critical times. <![CDATA[<b>Maxillofacial Radiology 199</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162022000400009&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 lockdown has had a psychological and social impact on dental students globally. AIM: To determine the psychosocial effect on students enrolled in dentistry and oral hygiene courses at UWC. OBJECTIVES: To determine the psychosocial effects (living conditions, levels of anxiety, fear of COVID-19, and food security levels) experienced by students during the lockdown. DESIGN: A descriptive, cross-sectional study using a quantitative approach was used. METHODS: A randomised sample (n=250), stratified by sex and academic year group, comprising undergraduate oral hygiene BOH total students = 90 and dentistry BDS total students = 450 (UWC, 2020) was used. Data was gathered via an online survey, (Google Forms). Survey questions included the GAD-7, FCV-19S questionnaire, and Food Security scales. RESULTS: The data were analysed using Epi Info 7. The response rate was 36% (n=90); 69.67% were female; the mean age was 22.34 (SD = 2.66); 91% lived with their parents during lockdown. Students' main sources of funding were parents (47%), NSFAS or bursary (42%) and self-funded (11%). Substantial psychosocial effects with high anxiety (33%), fear of COVID-19 (47.3 %), and a lesser effect for food insecurity (FI) (5.49%) was reported. CONCLUSIONS: The study showed that the COVID-19 pandemic has contributed to psychosocial effects in a discipline that under 'normal" conditions is experienced as stressful. This requires educational institutions to develop a targeted approach through relevant support systems that would identify vulnerable students at critical times. <![CDATA[<b>Probing <i>Status Quo Bias </i>in Dentistry</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162022000400010&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The status quo bias in dentistry refers to a practitioner's preference for certain treatment modalities and resistance to contemplating the need for a change. Lack of updating skills and amending their work routine accordingly can result in them providing treatment that is dated or even totally obsolete. It could even be detrimental to their patient's oral health and open them up to the risk of litigation. The concept of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) was introduced to try enforce clinicians to improve their knowledge and skills, and keep abreast of current best practice recommendations. However, it should not be seen as a mere points collecting exercise that has little effect on bringing about changes in their work. Dentists need to continually review their work, and make adjustments when necessary in order to do better and be better. Only then can they claim to be acting in their patients' best interest and fulfilling their duty of beneficence. <![CDATA[<b>What's new for the clinician - summaries of recently published papers</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162022000400011&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The status quo bias in dentistry refers to a practitioner's preference for certain treatment modalities and resistance to contemplating the need for a change. Lack of updating skills and amending their work routine accordingly can result in them providing treatment that is dated or even totally obsolete. It could even be detrimental to their patient's oral health and open them up to the risk of litigation. The concept of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) was introduced to try enforce clinicians to improve their knowledge and skills, and keep abreast of current best practice recommendations. However, it should not be seen as a mere points collecting exercise that has little effect on bringing about changes in their work. Dentists need to continually review their work, and make adjustments when necessary in order to do better and be better. Only then can they claim to be acting in their patients' best interest and fulfilling their duty of beneficence. <![CDATA[<b>Odontography</b>]]> http://www.scielo.org.za/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0011-85162022000400012&lng=es&nrm=iso&tlng=es The status quo bias in dentistry refers to a practitioner's preference for certain treatment modalities and resistance to contemplating the need for a change. Lack of updating skills and amending their work routine accordingly can result in them providing treatment that is dated or even totally obsolete. It could even be detrimental to their patient's oral health and open them up to the risk of litigation. The concept of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) was introduced to try enforce clinicians to improve their knowledge and skills, and keep abreast of current best practice recommendations. However, it should not be seen as a mere points collecting exercise that has little effect on bringing about changes in their work. Dentists need to continually review their work, and make adjustments when necessary in order to do better and be better. Only then can they claim to be acting in their patients' best interest and fulfilling their duty of beneficence.